The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode 501 ยท 4 weeks ago

Michael Cirillo: 4 Reasons Why You Know Way Less Than You Think About The Car Business

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In this episode of The Dealer Playbook Podcast, Michael reflects on an experience he had while attending the Digital Marketing Strategies Conference in Napa Valley and why that's inspired him to talk about the 4 levels of competency.

There is so much to learn about the retail automotive industry, and that's why it's important as a community to engage in learning; remain curious, and figure out creative ways to solve the complex challenges that the automotive industry faces today.

Main Takeaways From This Episode:

01:50 - Michael sets up the conversation by sharing his experience at DMSC in which he discovered how much he has to learn about the car business. Why that's important and how it leads to understanding the 4 levels of competency or understanding. There is always more to learn, and that's one of the reasons the retail car business is exciting to be part of.

05:59 - There are 4 levels of competency. Michael explains what they are and how they can have an impact on our daily lives.

09:16 - Each of us experiences the 4 levels of competency at various points in life. We are each in one of the 4 phases continuously for a variety of reasons.

10:34 - We can elevate one another with our experiences and wisdom. Together we can dominate. The retail auto industry is rapidly changing and together we can meet the demand.

Listen to the full episode for even more insights and context about the 4 reasons why you know less than you think about the car business.

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Get Your Google vehicle adds up and running fast with flex dealercom. The car business is rapidly changing and modern car dealers are meeting the demand. I'm Michael Cirillo and together we're going to explore what it takes to create a thriving dealership and life in the retail automotive industry. Join me each week for inspiring conversations with subject matter experts that are designed to help you grow. This is the dealer playbook. Hello, hello, welcome to this episode of the dealer playbook podcast. Today is just me. I don't know. Do you feel that way? Jet Is just a little all Sorillo. Hopefully you're okay with that. I've got something on my mind and on my heart I want to share with you. It's something I've been thinking about actually consistent way since I returned...

...from DMSC. That is the three day event that the pass brothers put together, Brian Pash and Glenn Pass, through PCG digital. What a phenomenal event it was out in an APP of Valley. I think this is the last time they did it this year and NAPPA valley and they're exploring other venues somewhere else in the country. Little side note. It was beautiful. The weather was magnificent but, more importantly, so many connections made and, of course, being able to reconnect with many people that I've met over the years. Always a fun time. I was sitting in the conference about it. It was probably halfway through the second day and I am in awe, mindblown, not just from the subject matter experts but in particular watching Brian and Glen moderate panels and offer keynote presentations. And I think it was about halfway through the...

...second day and I texted my Cteo Dan something like I don't know anything about the car business. Now, to give you a little bit of context, no, I'm not a new bee. No, I'm not brand new to the industry. In fact, I think at time of recording I'm going into my twenty second year in the retail auto industry. So yes, of course there are things I've learned over the years. Yes, I have acquired knowledge. Yes, I am curious and always wanting to learn more. I like to think that I'm a sponge. However, when contrasted against someone whose hands reach so much further, into so many more circles and through so much more subject matter, I sit here, the humble student in awe, overwhelmed a little bit by there is so much more I must know. Do you ever...

...feel that way? Do you ever feel overwhelmed that maybe you just don't know enough? Maybe there's there's more to learn? Maybe you're inspired, like I am by the Pash brothers in how much knowledge they've acquired and how how well they are able to articulate and explain their knowledge to us. I think that's totally okay. Having those moments of humility, I think are perfectly healthy. And we are all in an industry where there's this this unspoken invincibility factor, I feel like, where if we don't know something, we can't admit it, we can't be vulnerable, we can't be a subject matter expert, but also still acknowledge that there's so much to learn. And here I sit with you openly admitting, holy balls, there's so much more for me to learn,...

...and that excites me. That actually gives me something almost tangible I feel like I can sink my teeth into. There's so many notes and topics that I came away from that conference, whether it was listening to my new friends Patrick Abbad or do you know Walsh and hearing how they lead their organizations and how they grow their their dealerships and what their visions are and how they pull the best out of their people. Such inspiring stuff and I guess the reason why I felt impressed to share this with you is because I want it to be normal to be vulnerable and admit there is more to learn. Perhaps you're a leader, maybe a first level leader, maybe you're a salesmanager, a team leader, maybe you're higher up in the ranks, doesn't matter. How incredible would it be for us as leaders to admit and be vulnerable that there is more for us to learn, or to be vulnerable enough to admit that...

...perhaps somebody on our team has taught us something valuable? I was listening to my Pal David Spezax podcast and there was a little portion where him and his guests are talking about the lessons learned through parenting, and I always think about that because there's there's certainly a lot that I think I've taught my children, but naturally in the journey of learning to be a parent there's so much that they've taught me and you know, I think about conversations that I have sometimes with my children where I'll say, you know what, but I've never had a thirteen year old. I don't know what I'm doing. You know that sort of a thing, and we can create that journey together and I think something special happens when two parties can come together and be willing to admit that they don't know what they don't know. It makes me think of the board degrees or the four levels of competency. Have you ever heard of these?...

The four degrees of competency? First there is subconscious incompetence. Basically, you don't know what you don't know. The first time somebody threw a football at your head and it was like and in the head because you didn't know that you're supposed to catch it. I didn't know what I didn't know right, and that can sometimes plague us in the industry because we feel like we should know it, but we don't, but we can't let anybody know that we don't know what we don't know, and then we are just stuck in this hyperloop of suffering. That's the first level of competency, subconscious incompetence. Then we learn that we didn't know. This is the second phase of competency. Level of competency. We then are made aware that we didn't know it. So now we are consciously incompetent. Consciously Incompetent, oh now I know that I don't know. That allows us to move on to the third level of...

...competency, which is conscious competence. Conscious competence is you're still thinking through the mechanics of what it is you're doing. So, for example, if you go to a toddler and say tie your shoes, they're subconsciously incompetent. They have no clue that they didn't even know how to tie their shoes. They didn't even know that tying your shoes is a thing. Then you make them aware, they become kind aciously incompetent. Oh, here's this thing, now I know I didn't know. You then move on to teach them how to tie their shoes. Right, the bunny around the tree thing. So they move on to conscious competence. You can see that the hamster running in the head as they position their hands through each step of creating the loop with the laces and tying it around and pulling it through, and they move through a period of conscious competence where they have to really put effort into thinking through each...

...step. However, by the time you're while, hopefully by the time you're a teenager, you move on to the last level of competency, which is subconscious competence, you no longer have to think about it. It's a motor skill, it's natural. Right. If I said tie your shoes right now, you'd be able to tie your shoes while watching a TV and listening to a podcast and having this conversation with me. Well, I came away from DMSC and there's many other instances right listening to podcasts or attending another networking event, having a conversation with colleagues of mine, where, with a willingness to learn, I will ultimately go through all of the four phases of competency, the four levels of competency, and I'm not immune to feeling incredibly uncomfortable when...

I realize I didn't know something that I didn't know. And I'm extremely uncomfortable sometimes when I have to admit I didn't know what I didn't know. But the more I do it and the more curious I am, the more willing I am to learn, the more comfortable I become with admitting I just don't know what I don't know. Please teach me now. Each of us have experienced all those four levels of competency. But I guess really what was impressed upon me is, as an industry, if we can all admit that there is always more to learn, that we perhaps may not have a clear vision of the entire playing field with which we are all layers on. The more exciting the industry becomes, the more exciting our work becomes, the more excited we become to do the work, in other words, our willingness to put in the work increases, and that is just something that I feel so inspired...

...by and I hope you do too. I hope you got value in this brief little solo episode of the dealer playbook about why there is more to learn and why you should be okay with the fact that there is always more to learn. I hope that you take this to heart that together we continue to learn. There are so many amazing content creators in this industry and outside of this industry, and my desire for all of us is that we grow together. We elevate one another, we share the love and the positivity through knowledge and wisdom, through experience and failure, and we dominate together. Thanks so much for joining me on this episode of the dealer playbook podcast. I'm so glad you're here. By the way, just past five hundred episodes. Holy smokes, five hundred episodes, I posted something on social media, so inspired...

...and encouraged by all of the kind messages so many people saying. Man, I've been with you since the beginning. Holy Crap, that's almost ten years. Your support means the absolute world to me. Thank you so much for being here. Let's move on to five hundred more, shall we? I'm Michael Sirillo and you've been listening to the dealer playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, please click the subscribe button wherever you're listening right now, leave a rating or review and share it with a colleague. Thanks for listening.

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