The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 8 years ago

Cory Mosley: Win More Car Sales Business

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

 

"You get no where sitting still but left behind".

 

 - Cory Mosley

 

You ever hear someone say "It's time to go back to the basics"? What does that mean exactly? Do we really think that just going back to the basics is the solution for growth in business? 

 

In this episode of "The Dealer Playbook" podcast we welcome sales trainer Cory Mosley who is talking about how auto dealers need to think forward and outside the box in todays market for growth in their business. 

 

If you are not familiar with Cory Mosley he is the founder of Mosley Automotive a sales training company headquartered in Richmond VA. Cory also is the creator of Mosley 24/7 a video on demand training solution for next level automotive professionals. 

 

In this session you will learn more about: 

 

- FMA " First Mover Advantage" 

 

- Not following the pack and doing what your competitors are not

 

- How to not have a "back to the basics" mentality 

 

- Looking outside the auto industry for inspiration 

 

- Adding new skills to your people that they have never had before

 

- The break down in your training process

 

All that and so much more are packed into this episode with Cory Mosley. 

 

We all know by now that the "basics" are still important for any business or industry but are not the formula for massive growth in your business. 

 

Where to get more of Mr. Cory Mosley:

 

Cory Mosley's Website - http://www.mosleyautomotive.com 

 

Cory's Twitter - https://twitter.com/CoryMosleyWay

 

Make sure to comment first below on your thoughts about this session and you might be the lucky one to get a signed copy of his new book " The Way I See It". 

 

Now it's your turn

 

 

Sound off below and tell us what you think of this session of "The Dealer Playbook". Make sure to subscribe if you have not already and share with a friend that might like what we are doing. Thanks again!"You get no where sitting still but left behind".

 

 - Cory Mosley

 

You ever hear someone say "It's time to go back to the basics"? What does that mean exactly? Do we really think that just going back to the basics is the solution for growth in business? 

 

In this episode of "The Dealer Playbook" podcast we welcome sales trainer Cory Mosley who is talking about how auto dealers need to think forward and outside the box in todays market for growth in their business. 

 

If you are not familiar with Cory Mosley he is the founder of Mosley Automotive a sales training company headquartered in Richmond VA. Cory also is the creator of Mosley 24/7 a video on demand training solution for next level automotive professionals. 

 

In this session you will learn more about: 

 

- FMA " First Mover Advantage" 

 

- Not following the pack and doing what your competitors are not

 

- How to not have a "back to the basics" mentality 

 

- Looking outside the auto industry for inspiration 

 

- Adding new skills to your people that they have never had before

 

- The break down in your training process

 

All that and so much more are packed into this episode with Cory Mosley. 

 

We all know by now that the "basics" are still important for any business or industry but are not the formula for massive growth in your business. 

 

Where to get more of Mr. Cory Mosley:

 

Cory Mosley's Website - http://www.mosleyautomotive.com 

 

Cory's Twitter - https://twitter.com/CoryMosleyWay

 

Make sure to comment first below on your thoughts about this session and you might be the lucky one to get a signed copy of his new book " The Way I See It". 

 

Now it's your turn

 

Sound off below and tell us what you think of this session of "The Dealer Playbook". Make sure to subscribe if you have not already and share with a friend that might like what we are doing. Thanks again!

Oh how I enjoy listening to the dealer playbook podcast, episode thirteen, featuring of the man himself, Mr Corean Mosley. Here we go. You're dialed into the dealer playbook podcast, where it's all about winning auto dealer strategies that deliver proven results. And now your hosts, Robert Weissman and Michael Cirillo. All right, everybody, what is going on? Michael Cerrillo and Robert Wiseman here with the dealer playbook. Robert, what's going on, brother Michael? Glad to be here. Man, how's everything going? Good? So, and it's like, you know, you make it sound like we don't talk to each other very often, but I'll tell you what, people, we, Robert and I, talk to each other five million times a day, and even more when we're doing these podcasts, because we look forward to doing them so much and just feel so fortunate because we get to interview the WHO's who in the industry. Today's no exception. We have Corey Mosley from Mosley automotive. You can check them out online Corey Mosleycom or Mosley automotivecom. He's a speaker, an author, a present or a thought leader. The information that you will here in today's episode is going to be mind blowing because he talks about something. I'll admit that at first when Robert, when you pitched the the the title and the concept to me, I was a little bit hesitant, and I think you were too. Why was that? Well, because the title this is you know, he had an idea of talking about how the back to the basics, strategies and mindset and just that kind of approach. You know, it's right. You need to get back. It's down to get back to the basics. Isn't the path to sales growth and and and I got you where you were coming from on there and then, you know, in our pre show and then actually through the podcast, you here where cory it's a little bit more than that and it's very interesting. He's great speaker and has just a you know, so knowledgeable. I'll tell you what. Let me, let me just fill everybody and here's where I was coming from. So we hear a lot in the industry. I'll agree with Corey. Back to basics. I mean you'll agree. Hey, let's get back to the basics. Well, I'm kind of a basics thinker. I'm thinking, like you know, what? There's so many things that we know we should be doing in the industry, something simple like pounding the phones or, you know, skipping working on our our ability to schedule appointments over the phone, things that we know we should be doing that our, quote unquote, the basics, but that we're not doing. So I'm always like, you know, before you can advance and conquer, you need to be looking at the basics. Well, cory, I have to say, has expanded my vision, he's expanded my understanding. He talks about going how going back to basics really is a sales killer, and so you're going to hear him talk about it here explain his point. By the end of it, I'm pretty sure you're going to come around to the same way of thinking that I had and learn new things that you can be doing right now, starting today, to dominate your market, dominate your business, expand and conquer. Make sure that you stay stick around till near the tail end of the the conversation with Corey for your chance to get a free copy of his newest book, the way I see it, by Corey Mosley. Let's do it and just like that, everybody, we are here. It is the dealer playbook. And, as we said in the INTRO, we are here with good friend and somebody I look up to and love. What you know, hearing him speak and listening to it and consuming his content, is a Corey Mosley from Mosley automotivecom. That's a great hit his company's website. Definitely check it out. Cory, thanks a milion for being here. Man, Oh my pleasure, guys. Awesome, awesome, and we just hooked up. We were I met you. I think we met in person. The first time was at it was definitely I want to show Sean's Internet sales twenty groups and you got the first chance to meet Michael at the previous one in Atlantic city.

We were talking and we are able to put this together. So Corey's here today, guys, to talk about interesting topic, about how back to the basics thinking and strategies is not the way, you know, the path to sales growth. And initially, before even the pre show we're talking my my initial reaction to that was, so you mean to tell me that something as basic as more phone activity, you know, just dialing more numbers by and a representative, is not the path the sales grows. So is that what's so cory? What what exactly when you're talking about back to the basics? What kind of back to the basic thinking? You know, do you mean directly? Well, at the end of the day, you know, here's the thing that that that's funny about our business, and Robert, I know from you being at a bunch of sessions of fun you know, I tell a story about the monkeys and kind of how the origin of Monkey, see, monkey do came about. And the nature of our business is we have these things that just roll off our tongue. It's no different in the word tracks is no different than, you know, if a could you Woodin, what would it take to earn Your Business? kind of the stuff that if you spend any time on the retail side of the business, like in a store, we all have should have learned or came across at one point in time. So this idea of basics being the answer, and I hear this often when I when I talk to people or dealers and really, cory, where we just got to do is just get back to basics and get back to basics and basics, basics, basics. But the reality is things that we're doing about taking the approach of just getting back to basics actually create more challenges because we never see any type of competitive advantage. You know, people like to talk about the idea of crushing the competition and doing holy things, all of these things, and I don't know how that crushing of the competition happens or really the separation, as all like to talk about, really takes place when we're just focused on kind of this idea of getting back to basics and that that's going to solve our problems. If, you know, Oh, we got to get back to a hundred percent teo or we gotta, you know, pound those phones. I asked a general manager in the country, Hey, you know, what do you want, you know, from your sales team? Oh, I want to sell more cars. But we never define that. We never deep dive that. Most people don't sit around in a meeting and say, you know, what can we do to get ahead? And when you use terminology like getting back to basics, that kind of keeps you in this cage, that doesn't have you thinking forward by thinking about what we can go back to do in the past. And you know, last time I checked, I mean histories to be learned from. So a lot of cases it's not always ideal to be repeated. Okay, I got you. So you made a comment. I saw you it was and it was a quote to from from somebody I had and I apologize, I forget who you were quoting, but you were saying that you know, thinking of you know, or thinking that doing what got you, you know, here, is that is going to get you there. Am I right? Something along the Mark Goldsmith who is written several books. One of his titles of his books is what got you here won't get you there, and it's idea and again, in its simplicity of statement, it's basically saying some of the things that we used to do aren't effective anymore. And I've talked about this for it for years. The law of diminishating returns, you know, as a universal law which, from an automotive standpoint, boils down to say if we continue to do the same things over and over again, sooner or later to use their effect or lose their effect. And you know, the greatest, the best kind of way I caption it is if the majority of buyers in your store not first time buyers, then chances are they've seen this movie before. Yeah, good one, good one, good one. So so what? What kind of things should went when they're going into that meeting and they're talking about the the growth, that growing, the sales and the back to the basics. Even just saying that term, it brings nothing to the table. What what's going to bring it to the table? What...

...should they be done? Well, think about it from an innovative standpoint. One of the greatest fears that we have in our industry that is very, very common, is the WHO else is doing it mentality. You go in, you have a good idea and you may talk to a dealer about it or present it and so we'll go, well, what other deals are you working with? Who Else is doing it? See, this is principle that is not often taught in our industry but is taught in every major business school and it's the principle called FMY, which is first mover advantage, and first mover advantage talks about the ability to gain market share and control market share by being first, and it's counterproduct, counter kind of productive our industry, because we're in industry and doesn't always like to be first, and we think about that. I would say ten years ago, when email marketing came on the scene and we were one of the first companies that was involved with distributing an email marketing program which today is known as auto revenue, which is owned by Dominion now, but we were one of the first people that had the opportunity to be involved with that through some some resell its and targeting, and it was amazing to talk to dealers who where you're talking about things like email marketing through the database and getting opt ins and building your database and and marketing and remarketing ten years ago. At that time it was very foreign. Nobody wanted to be first. Everyone to know who else was doing it, who else was doing it, and then of course comes the market saturation. So my challenge to everybody ultimately is to look at first mover advantage and look at ways that you can go first to market. And Robert, you certainly can appreciate this more than anybody. Two Thousand and fifteen models are coming out. So what are we doing about it? You're a big advocate of video are as. Those cards are hitting. Are these stores first to the market with getting their video content out? Are they first to market with starting to educate two consumers? And we're on a podcast right now that you know people across our industry or listening to. Where was that ten years ago? So if it again, if we were just saying, let's get back to basics, let's, you know, get our product knowledge strong, and that's important, but let's just get that. But how we disseminating the information? So how can we be first? Where the areas that we can move first with new product, move first with things that we're not saying? The one thing I know about the Internet is everything that we could possibly want to do, I want to know, is available to us through content that's available. And again, I'm talking to a group of people here who are who are trying to be ahead of the curve and stay ahead of that curve. So when I talk about first, first movers advantage, and I talked about not simply having a back too basis mentality, it's how do we study where we going? What are other things going on outside of our industry in terms of consumer behavior? We're still learned about things like heat mapping and understanding where our people go, which have been around for years and studied in years or four years in other industries. We don't record our sales people doing sales pitches like the IBM's and the Xerox has and the major corporations do, so they can learn and get critiqued and get better. We don't do that kind of stuff on a grand scale. So the reason why we hear about this dealer or that dealer is because, out of the twenty one thousand, six hundred and seventy two dealers, there's only a small percentage of doing anything innovative. So you know, you don't get anything by sitting still except left behind. So we're really talking about you know, by now you should already know the basics. You need to be moving onto more progressive thinking. Like the concept of going back to basics if you don't even know what the basics are isn't going to help you. You should already know how to do those things, the pounding of the owns that the sales pitches, the word tracks. But you should be looking for ways to add to that or enhance what you're doing to kind of you know, we, like you said, dominate the market, but how? How are you going to dominate the market with basics? Is essentially what you're saying correct. So you know, for example, when we built mostly seven, which is our own demand portal. We start, I said when I...

...wanted to do the content. We started to write the content, I said, I'm not going to start with how to do a handshake and how to greet somebody and you know, don't have smoke on your breath when you're talking to customers. I mean that's that's just kind of things that people should know. We should be beyond that at this particular point. So I want it from a content level and I want it from a messaging level. I want everybody to start to look at what we're not doing. When you get all your managers in a room, you start making decisions on strategy. Well, how does that differ if all of you come from the same school of thought? Well, we need to invite other schools of thought to the table. Adding new skill. You know you can market yourself to death, but adding new skills and your sales people adding new skills, which means they're adding skills that they have not been had before. That's several things. One getting it effectively assist with your new higher process in terms of retention. I don't need to tell anybody on this call about the turnover rate in our industry numb too. It takes underperformers that we normally would just dismiss and say, Oh, you know what, they can't make it. We gave two months, they're off their training salary, they can't hit their numbers. Get Out. It gives them an opportunity to learn some things that will be more affective for today's customer. And then the third person is every store has salespeople who may be effective but have plateaued. So they're hitting the same number every month no matter what, which could be good if the numbers high enough, but chances are they're missing out on units. So adding new skill and not just taking a back to basics approach is our way, in my opinion, the way forward. So let me ask you this, Corey. Do you feel like, because you know, and I'm just going to say it this way, maybe lack of better words, but do you feel like, because the standard is so low, that the basics are viewed has progressive solutions? I mean, you know it's like in your career and in our careers, we see, we observe so many dealerships who aren't doing the basics. Do you feel like we've kind of set the bar too low, because now it's like hey, well, look at the dealership who's making seventy five or a hundred phone calls a day. Look at all the deals are getting because they they're making these phone calls, and making the phone calls is such a basic thing that that becomes, you know, almost in the view of the dealers, that that that basic thing becomes a progressive thing. You know what I mean? And Corey M I've heard you say yourself that, especially when he's saying with the basics. In some markets, though, you can get away with the just good enough, you know, a mean or just the basics, because which, by the way, and levels exactly? Which? By the way, that word combination, just so we're all clear, I think needs to be removed from the English language. Good enough. I totally despise it. Sure, sure, well, and there's a couple I mean really, there's a couple different drivers to it. Number One, let's not get away from the fact of what what we do as an industry or what a dealership represents. So you have the full power of the manufacturer and their brand recognition. So if I've got the right store in the right market place, there's a lot of things that are going to happen just because I say it's the salespeople all the time and some of them kind of smirk at me and look at me sideways. But you know, it's easy to sell cars to a group of people who are buying anyway. So the reality of is so you know, I got I've got a least coming up. So you know, if my LEASA IS UP June thirty one, guess what, unless I'm going to give up driving on my needs about driving change, I'm going to have to buy something. So the day I left the you know, retail side of the business, I turned into keys to my demo on a Friday and I walked into a dealership Saturday morning with a need to buy a car. So everything beyond question helpful. How close are you to your least being up? No,...

...seriously, no, seriously, like, I'm not trying to, I don't sell cars anymore. But but like, how far out have you been contacted as your rep as your salesperson started selling you yet? Well, I'm a little bit of an anomaly, only because I actively switch out of my car's way before, way before any of my leases. That stuffs up. So I'm a bit of a nominally. But I will tell you, though, like I'm in. I'm based in Richmond Virginia now. So as I've been car shopping, I've replaced about two cars since I've lived here. And I don't go in, as you know, Corey Mosley, blah, Blah Blah. You go in, like you said, like heathcliff hugstable on that episode of the cause we showed. Yeah, I don't. I don't know. You know, listen, I still wear with some of my closet. But, but, but I go in and observe it and I can just tell you from recent experiences. I'm I'm flipping out of two cars right now. I'm in the process of literally waiting for a car to come in right now, and I can tell you that going to a couple of dealships. I have a dealship that still hasn't followed up with me once since I left the dealship. So and that sales person happened to be new. So what that tells me is there's definitely a breakdown in that dealships training process about follow up, a doing it, which we could say it's a basic principle, but be how to do it. So there's clearly your breakdown, but they've got a multimillion dollar facility that's brand new that they just put up and it looks beautiful. But they're but there's some basic things in the back to base scenario that they're not doing to even talk about getting advanced. So really it's almost like, you know, you mentioned earlier, there's there's so many other industries that are applying extremely effective principles in their marketing and and the way they do business that we haven't adopted yet. And really, in so doing, I guess that the culture right now is that we're backtracking as an industry. We're saying back to basics when, again, there's these things that you should already know how to do, that you should be doing. There's breakdowns and training, there's breakdowns in process, but it's like, you know what, let's let's buckle up here, let's get these things done so that we can advance and conquer. Well, and here's the other thing I want to point out, because it's easy to, you know, talk about what everybody's doing wrong. I'm immensely sympathetic to deal with principles and executive managers because they have a million different things getting thrown at them. I don't think there's an actual dealer in the country that I could talk to that would say, you know, Corey, I have no interest in being better, I have no interest in being efficient, I have no interest in having a great team. But obviously they have the manufactor coming at them. They got bills this small businesses. We forget that, but they're small businesses as well. So I'm amazing. I'm sympathetic to that. But here's the issue. The next layer below them are the people that sit in the largest gap of opportunity. So we talk about the salespeople or BDC or the Internet manager. We talked about them as the entry point to the customer. But but in that influence pyramid is that management team that sits in between the dealer principle, who's got to run a business and got twenty other things going on or people pulling at him, and the core managers that are responsible for that. And I got to tell you, when we think about it from a management standpoint, this is one of the only industries not I'd love to hear your guy thoughts on this, but this is one of the only industries that I know of where, once you get anointed manager. You get to stay, you get to go be a manager everywhere that you go without any real ongoing training or and then then a lot of them, not all of them, because I know some great managers, but then they take on this attitude that or I'm a manager now. So anything that you've got to say, you know, direct that to the salespeople and I'll tell you a real quick story, not that I love to hear your feedback because I know that you know exactly what I'm talking about. But we finished a three and a half month program out in Arizona with with a very well known dealership and three and a half month program reworking word tracks the whole deal and managers always too busy to show up for training. And as we're leaving the store we undid all the if I could you,...

...wodges and come on downs and really worked hard to do that. Got grosses up, I think three hundred fifteen dollars a copy closing presentagers up. So really worked hard and did a good job with it, in my opinion at least. But as we're leaving there's a new hire that's in the sales office and I always remember this is a few years ago to always remember it. And as I was saying goodbye and thanking the sales manager, you know this is our last visit to the store. Thank him saying goodbye, I walked in as he was doing a quote unquote, training session and he ended the training session by telling the Salesperson he was coaching them about a phone call. Hey, you know, if all else fails, just do what I do. Tell him to come on down and I just put my head down, shook it and walked out. But that's what we're fighting. That's why I'm in that's why I'm in business. That's why the the the the several names that we all know are in business because that opportunity exists every every day. And even people who train, even people who say they train all the time or oh core, we have sales means every day. We train every day. The problem sometimes with the information age is the age of the information. What are you training on? Are you just trying to hammer down the tactics from one thousand nine hundred and eighty, or we talking about progressive strategy, because rehashing great news as a as a delivery or banks require one third down and all these things. Rehashing that stuff over and over again. To me, it's just not the path to sales growth. Yeah, I mean, and that's for I mean set all, that's you mean any sales manager, anybody in management listening? I mean, that's your at least your way to sales growth, personally, for you, financially, is to, you know, be online, is to try to unlock new strategies, tag dicks, etc. And and, you know, review them with your team, you know, take some responsibility with them and and, you know, and and try to keep them in with the latest and the greatest. That's only going to affect in your career and enhance your career and your your life period. Robert, you we all know Steve Jobs, right. We know Steve Jobs, of course, right. He had a great saying I use all the time. He said you can't mandate productivity. It's an organization's responsibility to equip its sales team with the tools they need to be successful. You can't call a meeting and say you're not making enough calls. You guys aren't still enough, cause you suck. We need to get better. Somebody's getting fired if there's not twenty people in the store this weekend and then leave the meeting. My go ahead Bychael. Sorry, you're that's good, that this is all in line. So I was going to ask you. Okay, let's talk specifically two managers right now. You mentioned something that, you know, kind of made me chuckle. You you use the word anointed manager and then proceeded to talk about you know that this cycle of management that these guys get into, where they just kind of take a step back and that maybe a little bit, get disconnected from their crew or, as you say, at the largest gap of opportunity for managers listening in right now. Where do they start? How do they break this chain so that they can move forward in a culture, in an environment inside the dealership that is progressive and not backtracking? They start by getting the information and not just making the assumption that it's only relevant to the salespeople. They have to become the student, just like everyone else. So how can you be effective leader if you're not exposed to information? How can your guys go to workshops that you don't go to? Or, worse yet, you know, the most pressing thing that I hear, or that really it's just really tragic to me, is that the end user, so is that this this one person, or usually one person, that stands in the way of the in user getting the information. So you think about training, you think about you know, we talked about meeting at these workshops. These workshops should have ninezero people in them, not a hundred and...

...fifty. This should be right, hundreds and hundreds and thousands of people, because if we collectively looked at who needed this information, that numbers in the thousands. However, because it boils down to one person getting it, quote unquote, and making the decisions. So there's one guy in a store or girl in the store right now who is presented with an opportunity to do training or to get education for their team and they're going, oh, I don't think we need that. And then now the fifteen people, to twenty people, the thirty people that they lead now suffers the consequences of that decision. So my message to managers is number one, we all have opportunities for growth. If we were on video here, my I'll put my library against ever anybody's library in the industry and no, I haven't read all the books, their resources, their references, and I'm constantly learning and growing information so I can process it, apply it to my business and then make it available to the industry that has provided for me for sixteen years and give it back. So I don't get I don't I don't take credit for creating at all, but I can tell you what. I'm curating it as best I can to make it valuable. So, as a manager, I want to be the why not be the first person to get that information? How can we have arrived at the destination already when our business is evolving? So how can I be a manager ten years of fifteen years, of twenty years in the business and say I've arrived at the destination already when every single day, the people who are ten times smaller in us are out there creating algorithms and and and studying consumer behavior and giving us new queues and information to help us be more effective? How can I just turn that switch off and hould my sharpie in my hand and say let's work a deal? I mean, that's this sit well, and you know I'll say this, I think one of the most attractive things about the automotive industry for me is that, you know, I think we'd all agree, at its core it is an industry that thrives on selfmastery, on progression, and right now it's just a matter of making sure that that message is research fest and penetrates more people in the industry. Like you said, these workshops shouldn't have a hundred and fifty people at them, they should have a thousand, two, thousand, tenzero in. You know, and I think for me it makes sense that the first thing that people need to do in getting the information is they also have to gage their commitment level and how much they actually want to be a part of something that's as big as it is, you know, and I think that builds the stage. You know, that willingness, that desire to acquire the information and to do something with it is what will really set people apart and I think in so doing, maybe might sound basic but is actually one of the most progressive things that people can do is always have the desire to learn more and to be added upon. What do you want it? And the only challenge that I'll say to that idea of selfmastery is I disagree to the point that the numbers don't support the theory that work it may reward selfmaster we would that we're we're committed to it. Because real estate agents they're selfmastery people, MLM marketers their selfmastery people, the people that are paying to go to the events and getting the information our selfmastery people. If you look at a workshop and you look at the typical workshops that we all know of that we participate in, a we go to, and you pulled every person that was sitting there and saying, did you pay for yourself? Most of them, the large majority, and we're going to tell him no. And then, when asked, would you have come if you had to pay for yourself? That's the answer that I want to know. So that's the kind of we don't think the same way as an industry that a real estate agent does who works under the blanket of a franchise idea or a franchise system or organized system like automotive dealers do, or an Mlm or what have you. So we don't think about...

...it the same way. We think about it as if if the dealer is going to the dealer is going to pay, then I'll go. If the dealers going to educate me, then maybe I'm open to being educated. But and again, you good. So that's a question that everyone listening and should ask what I'd be willing to pay to enhance my knowledge and enhance my my ability, or am I just simply waiting for my dealership to pay for me? I agree, because then and if your answer is I'm just going to sit around and wait, then you will. You will take the you'll ride the Waf of of success or lack thereof, that the deal should potentially ride. So and you should probably go find something that you're actually passionate about. And it's a monotonous job, so let's not make the mistaken. Only people that you know have done it can appreciate it. It certainly a monotonous job and there's things that we need to do to try try to keep it fresh and stay relevant, and there's no more fun that that you can have. I means there's a lot of great times and a lot of great things going on in our industry and certainly I don't begin a workshop or similar without addressing mindset and addressing that, because all the word tracks and discussion about how too is an execution in the world. Certainly, if we're not if we're not in from a mindset, if you're waiting for the call back, you're on the list to go to work at the post office, which is a great institution, but if you're on that list, because it's like two years long to get a job there. So if you're like hey, I'll sell cars in the meantime, or you know whole mortgages business. That was a huge thing. Right when mortgages were hot, you saw a ton of people leave the business to go do that and then when that went off a cliff, you saw those same people coming back into the business. So nothing wrong with that in the grand scary of things. We got to support our families. But but when you talk about are you in the business for the long call or or not, you know that's that. That's a huge key and I think it's clear. I mean even Robert, when we talk offline and kind of a conferences and stuff, when we start going you know, I don't think there's anybody that questions. Do I believe what I'm talking about right now. You know, just just just the whole execution of how we're having this conversation. So can you speak that passion? I talked about it. As you know. Are you drinking your own cool laid at the store? I mean you just got it. You got to get tuned in and and just, you know, fall in love with it and then you'll it. It's doesn't seem like work and you'll want it. I mean, that's what happened with me. I wanted to go. I can't tell how many how much I've invested on my education. I had no help with but I did it and I still do and you know I'll never stop. And that's what professionals do. You're right. There's like as a real estate agent, you're required to have x amount of hours of you know, education, monthly or quarterly, yearly, whatever. An automotive that there's, you know, it's which seems like almost a more complicated purchase right, is still you know that. There's nothing Maga factors mandated except, Oh yeah, it's factory certifications yet certified. You could still deliver a vehicle without that right. Of course. D's For drive. Have a nice day. was to cause we don't forget me on the survey. Here you go, Michael. Yeah, I'm sorry. Sorry, man, I'm sitting here taking notes because, you know, I think you know what this sounds like. This sounds like the beginning of a movement and something that should be picking up steam a lot faster. So and I'm on board with everything you're saying. Corey Robert mentioned you know, coming into this we were like, okay, what's where's? Where's HE gonna go with this? But it totally makes sense. You know, you should already understand the basics. You should already have implemented the basics. You need to be thinking about how to advance and conquer, how to be more progressive, how to do the things that your competitors actually aren't doing or are willing to do. I mean, if everyone's talking about going back to the basics, then there's no way for you to differentiate yourself. There's no way to set yourself apart and be unique. Would you agree with that? Here's a challenge. Next time here at to airport and going to pick up a rental car, just look at the back ends of all the cars and tell me if...

...you can tell them all apart without their badging. So the the cars are are equalizing in terms of what the options are. We're equalizing in terms of teching the vehicles. There's more places to spend fifteen thousand, twenty thousand, thirty thousand and ever before there's seventy percent of you know we love the make up statistics right, but seventy percent of the dealers are under construction right now. I mean go down your motor miles. Everybody's under construction or getting ready to go into construction. So we started changing door knobs. We're all serving starbucks coffee now in the dealerships. Where is the separation coming from? So if you're a Honda dealer, because they were one of the first to make everybody start to make changes, and I shot the three four hundred dealers in the area, you all have the same show room. Basically. You have the same cars, of course, but now hun days in the mix, key is in the mix. It's it's just a big competitive landscape. This is probably the most for me personally. This is probably one of the most tough decision making processes for my own personal purchases that I've had in years because there's so many things to look at. So you have to ask yourself as a salesperson or a manager or an owner, how are we winning? How we handling separation, how we delivering on a customer experience and how are we doing it? You know better than the next person, Corey. Thank you so much for being with us today. Just a wealth of information. I don't think anybody listening and feels like they were short changed on this. Tons of value. Pick up his book, the way I see it, by cory most absolutely will and Amazon Willer's that. That's it. Well, obviously you can pick it up on Amazon. It's a little cheaper on Amazon, but no doubt if you're interested, you're so funny. If you're interested in getting it signed at all, then buy from our website. I sign every every car. We will link them all into the show notes at the bottom and I'll know how in the world. I'm just now looking through mine. I don't even have a sign copy of this book, and that's unbelievable, man. I think because you did a smashing grab. Well, yeah, Charles, Charles Can and bought me this book for me, man, I didn't have any cat I'd had the old classic no cash on me. I was right. That sounds like you. Next time. And why why don't we do this? Why don't we do this for the for the people checking out this episode? Go to triple w dot the dealer playbookcom be. You know what, we'll give you a signed copy of Corey's book. What will will take care of that, cory? We were order about five books. So the first five people to comment with their feedback and questions, triple w dot the dealer playbookcom will hook you up with a signed copy of Corey Mosley's book. How else can people get hold of you? Awesome, you know. Obviously we're we try to be as all over the place as possible, but mostly Automotivecom, as Robert Mintion at the beginning. I'm on twitter at Corey Mosley. We keep it simple. Facebook, mostly automotive and you know, if you're not getting our weekly video series working, you stuff wednesdays, you know we're again. We want to have a responsibility to get good content. That's what you know. We're celebrating ten years in business this this actual May. So that's been a commitment I've had since day one. I want to get the information to people who want it and can make it usable and I think General Jim Rome said it best. He said he wants to share information with people who care. It's great way to put it. Thank you, Sim I'll also check it. Check out. What is it? Twenty Mosley Sevencom. It's is his twenty four twenty four hours day, seven days a week, virtual training platform. I was sniffing around it a little bit today because I'm a professional journalist, you know, and I wanted to get through some research. So and and I was out. I thought it was great man's. It's actually that's a one of the best kept secret out there. So check that out if you guys get a chance to, and again we'll link to that at the dealer playbook, butcom in the show notes. Cory. Will let you get back to it. Man, thanks so much for giving us the time today. Man, I appreciate you guys for having me have a good one out, no doubt. Thank you, take care...

...and there we have it. Everybody, Corey, Hashtag, money bags, Mosley, you know, giving his you know his take and, you know, just flexing some of his knowledge and his approach to a lot of things. I mean, the guys definitely a thought leader, great speaker. Delivery is always on point. My Michael, would you think? Yeah, you know, like, like I said, I came into this interview a little bit hesitant, but he definitely shaped the vision and the understanding. I think, hesitant because you're not you know. No, no, I mean has it in his capability. Oh, no, absolutely, not the mess. I got what you're saying. Yeah, just just hesitant in that. I think. You know, as an industry we need to be focusing on the things that we should be doing already. But, as you heard in the episode, it's like, oh, but you should already be doing these things. That's why they're the basics. So don't go back to the things that you should have already been doing. You should already be doing them period. Now move on, advance and conquer. So you know, I exceeded my expectations. I well, I shouldn't say it that way, but you know what I'm going for. He, you know, incredible speaker. He brought it home some valuable nuggets that I think everyone can apply to their individual store, their small business dealership, however you want to look at it, to advance and conquer exactly. And dealers, I know it's sometimes feels like you know, and Corey brought it up, where we're always talking about what what people are doing wrong, what we're doing wrong in this industry, and it's not really that. It's like I had I was in the dealership for a long time and I was the guy that was digging up the new things to do the next you know, wave the creative outside the box and I would really bring them to my dealer. The reason why I ended up really going like hard balls to the wall myself solo is because I was bringing them to my management and to even to the dealer, to Chry to implement and take action on for the store and it. They would get overlooked and they never want to put them an action. So you know, poke your people, because there could be that guy on there that's that's dialed in, you know, big time in and to advanced strategies that outside of automotive that are really really converted. So you can be that, you know, first one to you know, at scale for that particular platform or strategy, what have you. Yeah, absolutely. So check this out. You mentioned earlier in the pre show we are going to be giving away several copies of Corey's book. The way I see it, so the way to get your hands on by the sign by the author. Absolutely the way you're going to get your hands on that is by visiting the dealer. Playbookcom check out the show notes for this episode. Leave us a comment, leave us a question for cory we're going to read every single one of them. The first few people will say the first five people to comment on the show notes will get a free signed copy of the book. Will send that out to you. So good way to get started. On on, on education, on, on, on. Yeah, absolutely enies, don't forget to subscribe on Itunes, stitcher radio and until next time, thank you so much for stopping by and listening in. I'm Michael Srilla with Robert Weisman. This is the dealer playbook. Catch you later. Out of here.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (514)