The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 6 years ago

Greg Rollett: How to Build Trust With Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What does it take to build more trust through your marketing? Join us as Greg Rollett from Celebrity Marketing shares insights into how you can get the most out of your dealership marketing and build more trust with your target audience.

Greg has a client list that is likely unrivaled, boasting a list of clients from Brian Tracy and Tom Hopkins to Coca-Cola and Miller Lite. He spends his time helping companies achieve higher results through their marketing efforts. 

When you listen to the show, it's very clear that how passionate he is and that's for good reason. What he talks about works! It works extremely well!

Many dealerships are struggling to get more from their marketing efforts, and that's likely because there isn't enough trust between your business and the public. That's why Greg suggests that through your marketing you can convey a message to the public that will change their perception of your store and bring greater results.

Connect with Greg:

  • www.celebrityexpertmarketing.com
  • Twitter: @gregrollett

 

Hey, this is Greg Roulette,and you were hanging out with the dealer playbook podcast. You're dialed into thedealer playbook podcast, where it's all about winning auto dealer strategies that deliver provenresults. And now your hosts, Robert Weissman and Michael Cirillo. Hey,there, what's going on? You're listening to the dealer playbook podcast, whereevery single week we're sitting down and having conversations with the movers and the shakerswho will help you bring your career in the automotive industry to the next level. My name is Michael Cirillo. I'm joined with Robert Wiseman. What's goingon, dude? Hey, hey, hey, here we go. Sotoday another power player, and I know we try and not use that terminology, somebody else is using it, but whatever. That's the best way todescribe our guest today, Greg Rolette, who is the CEO of celebrity expertmarketing, and I mean this guy is so high energy. So I meanwhat he has to talk about resonates so well with with you know, orfalls in line with what we talked about a lot. But just here inhis angle and his perspective and seeing kind of the application of how it canbe used in the dealership is so incredible. You actually hooked up the Intro tothe show here with Greg. How did you get in touch with them? Well, I was, I was interested in and following a lot ofhis content for some time. Then I found out there was a connection betweenhim and our good friend Tracy Myers, that he's actually worked with Tracy onsome of Tracey, I mean this guy's well, doesn't trade serious, seriousplayers, Greg as in in, you know, in sales and business,and he worked with you know, worked with Tracy on some things too,and I found out that connection and then I found out that he was goingto be featured at one of the unfair advantage masterminds of one or two sessionsback and that's where we finally met in person. And Yeah, I'm abig fan of the stuff he does. And you know what, and it'scrazy, like you said. I mean he's working with some pretty crazy names. And I mean not only that, he's been featured. I'm looking hereat his bio. Man, he's been featured by Fox News, ABCNBCC,so all the major networks USA Today. The biography channel, A and Eink magazine, Wall Street Journal, i. and the list keeps going, Ikid you not. I stopped about halfway through there. But on topof that, just so many like big names, Michael Gerber, Brian Tracy, Tom Hopkins, I mean the guys worked with, the WHO's who andand you know he is one of the WHO's WHO's. So before we givetoo much away here, man, I think we just jump in and and, you know, get get right to our sit down, our conversation withGreg Rolette. Let's do it all right. And we are sitting down with ourguest today, who's a best telling author. He's a trust marketing expert. He's worked with some incredible names, Brian Tracy, Tom Hopkins, SallyHogshead, Dan Kennedy, I mean big companies like Cocacola and Miller lighte usethis man's information to increase profits and to reach more people. We're joined byMr Greg Rolette. Greg, thanks so much for being on the show withus today. What's happening? Guys? Super excited to be talking to youand really just helping everybody out who's listening to do some cool things. Man, it's exciting out there. Yeah, you know what and and what we'retalking about today is something that, you know, Robert and I are sopassionate about because we see an incredible need for it in especially in the carindustry. But we want to we want to tackle this concept of of whatcar dealerships or those that work at dealerships can do with their marketing to actuallyincrease the level of trust in the market place. I mean, it's nosecret. I was just on a call twenty five minutes ago with an individualthat said, man, I don't like...

...going to car dealerships because I feellike I'm always getting scammed, and it's so funny to me that that that, I guess, stigma or that mantra still exists from the consumer perspective.So let me pass this to you, because you you are a trust marketingexpert and I'm so curious what you have to say here. What can peopledo through their marketing to build the level of trust in the market place?Yeah, I think really the first place to start is that you got toknow that the fundamental principle of everything I teach, we teach her the agencyis that people buy from people and then buy from people that they know.I can trust. I know you guys have something, you know, similarto that with build relationships, with trust and that kind of stuff. Butit starts with people. Got To trust you. And there's a quote byBrennan Burchard, who's out and kind of the the expert space as well,and he says that no one will believe the message if they don't believe theMessenger. And I think that's truthfully important because now, and you guys knowit more than than anything, is people. They do their research online, theyknow the price, they walk into the dealership and they know I wantthat car, I know my rates, I know everything. Just make ithappen. But there's so much more that goes into that form a personal relationshipof how you build the business. And you know, I deal with alot of experts and a lot of spaces and you know, real estates nodifferent. Right real estate. You know the house, you know the price, you know your mortgage, you got everything. All you need the realestate agents to do is, you know, unlock the door, to show youin and sign the papers. So there's this this feeling from the consumerand that I don't need a person, you know, to help me withthe transaction, I just need them to, you know, unlock the the carand take me around for a test drive. And the person still,in this case maybe the auto salesperson, can still totally screw it up rightbecause they don't ask questions. They never they turn it into a transactional relationshiplike hey, yes, let's test out of the car, make a righthere, turn left there, let's turn back in the dealership. Here's yourpaperwork, you shake hands and is goodbye. That's not a relationship. They're there'sno marketing there, there's no personality there. You were just a guywho got lucky because you happen to have the right car at the right rate. And that's not who I want to be and I don't think that's whoanyone who listening right now wants to be. We should all want to be someonethat people want to be around, that you're important in their lives,that they feel like you help them to do something. I mean the carin the home, the two most expensive purchases people will make in their entirelife. Right we want someone to guide us through that process, but noone takes that step. So, you know, car dealer marketing, there'sso much of it. If you look at the Sunday paper and all itis is just a big list of cars, right. That's all it is,and the price on the cars. There's never the guy's photo. Sometimesit might be the dealer owner might have his photo on there, or maybeit's here in Orlando. Everything's David Moss something. Right. So it's theguy's name, but that nothing from the sales reps, nothing to develop report, nothing to develop a relationship. Like you know, come see you knowRobert, because he is the jeep specialist. If you want to take the jeepout on the beach on the weekend, talk to Robert because he is thedude. I know there's a guy in a master mind crew that theykind of does something similar to that Robert that you and I've been a partof. But you want to be that guy. And that's where trust comesfrom, because now when the conversation starts of you know, hey, Robertand I'm looking to buy a jeep, all you got to talk to thisguy. He's the jeep guy. Right. That is trust, because now nolonger are you going to the dealership hoping that the guy you know likeyou kind of the conversation you just had. I just want to go look atat trucks, right and the guy that met me at the front wasjust a random person at the at the dealership and he obviously was selling everycar on the lot and he couldn't tell me any specs on the trucks thatI wanted, you know. So how can I have trust in this person, you know, if he doesn't even know who I am? Don't asany questions and develop a relationship to build a rapport I don't kind of alittle all over the place right now, but I want to set the stagethat you can't just be someone who is the generalist and you can't just bea guy who's there for the transaction. You have to be someone who yourclients, who your prospects. Deam is important, like I have to workwith this guy because he's the guy and you're marketing, which we're going totalk more about today, needs to kind of do that. Does that makesense or do I need to do was I just all over the place there? No, and and it's so clear.

I mean it's funny because I thinkwe've finally met a guy who says passionate and nerdy about this stuff aswe are, and I get I got like excited. Man, I'm likeyelling at these people listening. But but it's the truth is that we allkind of get stuck in this. You know, I just sell cars orI'm in the certain department or whatever it is. They never think about,well, what can I do to enhance the lives of my clients? Youdon't want to be just waiting on the assembly line for the next guy toshow up and hopefully that's the guy who's going to buy the car that you, you know, know something about. Like that's not how trust is establishedat all. So, and this goes in mind was something that we've talkedabout on the show before, which is basically that you know your marketing is, you know, it's all about sharing the right message with the right audienceat the right time and, of course, using the right tone or, youknow, and in traditional terms, right copy or the right you knowwhat Hook, or whatever you want to call it. How does how doesthis all play into like what would a dealership do as a first step to, you know, start, I guess, expect or enhancing the experience that thatthe consumers getting through their marketing? Yeah, and so this is goingto be a little unconventional and I know there's there's people listening right now belike, well, we could never do that right, and I want toget over your head that yes, you can do this. It's up toyou to structure Your Business in the way that's going to deliver the best experiencefor the client. Not sure necessarily for your employees. Yeah, you wantto have great employees, want to keep them happy, you want to payhim good all that stuff. But if you're the dealer owner who's listening rightnow, your jobs is sell the most cars to the most people, whichmeans you got to set it up to deliver that type of experience. Soyou know, look at the inventory of your staff. I mean do atwenty right you can tell that you know eighty percent or if you're a Forddealership, eighty percent of the guys that sell F s are these two salesreps. will have your marketing that you're going out and doing to the public. Maybe it's a direct mail or maybe it's a newspaper, maybe it's aradio ad feature that guy as the f one hundred and fifty guy, right, you would have someone else is an awesome guy who knows everything about mustangs. And he can tell you every model of Mustang. Since like the sright, that guy should be out front in your marketing selling mustangs. Andso will somebody else get mad in the dealership? WHO's the Sales Rep Whialso knows? Yeah, they probably will, but then sell more than the otherguy. Right. So, you know, find ways to put peoplein front of Your Business, not just the cars. Because if you're theand I know you guys probably talk about this a lot, is like youdon't want to compete on price. If everything is competing on price, well, at some point someone's going to lose, because then there's no profit margin.You want to compete on, you know, delivering the best service,having the best team, having the most referrals, having, you know,this this great experience, and that starts with, in your world, isthe person right. So, you know, it's just fundamental to you know,the simple thing to do, the tactical thing to do, is dothat twenty, look at who's selling what and then start to create those ownexperts, make them personalities in your business. Now I can see right now alot of the dealers and you know people listening. They might be like, well, what you know? That's risky for me because of the turnoverthat this this industry is infamous for. But I think taking that kind ofyou know, putting that kind of strategy in place, because it's kind oflike what I did, but on my own. I think, though,that it would actually, you know, keep turnover to a minimum because of, you know, you getting behind these individuals and obviously it's going to putthem at you know, you know well your mind, showing them that theycan make something of themselves. Hey, join this team. I'm going tocelebrity or celebritize the crap out of you. Yeah, yeah, yeah, ifwe turn you into the F one hundred and fifty guy, and youare the F hundred and fifty guy, you can't really do anything. Youknow, you're not going to leave and go become the dodge Ram guy,right. So you know, and there's only like a handful of dealers thatyou would leave for. But you want to take care of that person enoughto where he wants to stay there and he wants to become the guy becauseit's going to increase his sales, it's going to make him happier, it'sgoing to allow him also to work with clients that he wants to work with. I bet the guy that's selling, you know, F s a monthhates the guy that comes in and wants...

...the Ford Taurus right. He doesn'tvibe with them. It doesn't jive with them. I mean it's you know, obviously I'm trying to give spific examples, but maybe you love selling the taurusesto the families you know or the you know. But you know,fine, what you're good at and and do that. The other thing thatyou can do also is too existing clients. You know, everybody that buys aMustang. You should probably have a Ford Mustang newsletter that goes out justto all the people to buy the mustangs, talking about the cool accessories in theevents and talking about the celebrities who drive them and talking about a newclient who just bought his and this is how he tricked it out. I'mjust making all this up, but now you really start to take care ofthe people, because now the guy who's got a the Mustang and he's gettingthis newsletter and his buddy says, Oh man, I've been looking at thosemustangs well, and now he's got material. Then now he can pass on ashey. You know, I get this newsletter every month from this dealerand it's all about mustangs. But now that trust is going from the personwho bought it, had a great experience and he's able to easily transfer thattrust to someone else. So it's not passing out a business card. Rightnow, you're saying, man, these guys are the these guys are theMustang guys, and just replace Mustang with whatever dealer you are. I don'tmean to alienate for guys you know, but you know, create something thatis worth remembering, right. So, become someone. The biggest word Ithink that I can share with you is is be someone important and create somethingimportant, because that's the only thing that people will pass around. No onetalks about a subpar or an okay experience or just he got the job done. People talk about the people who, you know, do things that makethem feel importance, right. So think about this kind of thing. So, I mean those two examples are are great starting points. Is, youknow, create, create the newsletter and and create personalities within your business.I think is bottom line where they should start to for this whole process.Well, and you know what, and it kind of makes sense because,as you I guess, become the main point of reference for a specific makermodel, I mean, and you you become the expert or the known expert. You're also specializing, so it's going to become easier for you to sellthat product all day long. Correct. HMM, a hundred percent. They'recoming to see you because you're the Guy Right. It makes the business soeasy. And so, in my opinion, marketing should do two things. Itshould attract the people that you want in your life and it should repeleverybody else. So the guy who loves selling, you know, a certaintype of car and doesn't like sell another type of car, he's probably hurtinghis sales when you're allowing him to go talk about, you know, carsto and I'm just making this out and I'm stereotyping, but marketing is stereotyping. It's about demographics and psychographics and putting the right message from the right markets. So you should alienate people. You should, you know, stereotyping asmany ways as possible. So you know the family that comes in, youknow that it's got two kids and you know husband and wife and they're goingafter the minivan or they're going after the the SUV or whatever it is.There's a certain type of person who resonates really good with those people and it'sprobably someone who has kids and has a minivan and can talk about it andworks with those types of clients all the time. He might might not bethe best person to put in front of a, you know, a fatherwith a sixteen year old girl who's looking to get a you you know,there's you really should marketing should be stereotypical. You should be segmenting and targeting,because now you're creating a better experience for everyone, for your sales team, you're creating a bet experience for the buyer, you're creating a better experienceall around, because it's Dan Kenned, one message, market match, right, hmm. And it's given you a higher quality because it's a most prequalifying the customer for you, just in your marketing message, and then it'sdelivering you a higher quality, you know, prospect or lead or customer, becausethey've pre qualified themselves, as in, okay, this is the Ford.I'm not going to call the F one hundred and fifty guy if I'mlooking for a Torus. You know what I mean. So kind of prequalifiesthe the customer a hundred percent, a hundred percent. I love what yousaid about, you know, the two main marketing objectives is that, one, it should attract the one the people that you want to do business with, and and number two, it should repel the ones that you don't.I mean, I think that that probably scares a lot of people. Wouldyou say? I mean they go, well, I want everyone, becauseI'm that good of a salesperson, but...

I think the reality of it isno, I mean you need to share the right message with the right audienceso that they're the ones that are coming into to be with you. Imean, we see it in our own business. We've we've, you know, positioned ourselves in the market place for what we do, where, youknow, some of the lower cost dealerships that don't want to pay a lotof money don't even bother's speaking to us anymore because they go well, that'sthat's not even what I'm interested in. On the flip side, you know, I feel like sometimes that's perceived as a bad thing, like no,we can try and upsell them in this and that and all those sorts ofthings. But on the flip side, what it's really done for our businessis it's allowed us to achieve our financial goals a lot faster, and italso it's it's different working with people that are willing to follow kind of theprogram that you have in place. So it almost becomes less work. Oh, totally, and it your hunters are right. It's scares the hell outof people right to say, you know, Hey, I'm marketing to everyone thatlives in Orlando right that wants a new car, to say I onlywant to focus on families with multiple kids to this, because then you justalienated the whole market place. But you're a hundred percent right that you know. So let's easy. Example, is my business. I know you kindof talks a little bit about yours too. Is that? You know, onthis podcast right now there are people who are listening who are like this, great guys nuts and I'm never going to hire him, and there's somepeople who are like, man, I totally resonume with what he does.I'd love for him to maybe write copy for me or, you know,create an act pain for me, right, and I want that because the guywho's kind of skeptical, the guy who's like this, would never workfor me. I'm not going to I'm going to hate picking up the phoneand talking to him. Right every time I talk to him. is goingto be an uphill battle and he's gonna, you know, think he's we're goingto contradict each other and he's gonna in and second guesses everything you do. Yeah, he's gonna Work Hill on price. Yeah, a hundred percent. And then the other guy is just like, dude, everything that yousaid I resonated with, like full steam ahead, whatever you need for me, let's go. And obviously that's why I want to work with right.So, but it should be the same thing in your business, you know, in the car pass is and whatever aspect that you are is. Again, you want to work with the people who they come into your dealership andyou're like that's my dude. Like they walk in, you see them firstimpression. Wow, like our marketing works. We just brought in the right person. You know, I already know exactly where I'm going to show them, what I'm going to share with them. It's a done deal and it's ait's just a better experience for everyone when they have that level of trustto where you know they know what they're getting into. You know what you'regetting into. It's a much better experience that you can custom tailor you're marketingfor them. You know, one of the biggest things, and and aRobert I share this with with a group with you before, is I calllike a pre indoctrination sequence. So if you can do your marketing right andyou can get someone to call to come in, you know, for anappointment to look at those trucks right, well, you can market to themfrom that time before they come into the dealership and continue to preframe them orpre indoctrinate them into your process. So you might be able to do let'ssay, so we're recording this on a Monday, and let's say I was, you know, I saw an ad today, but I'm working all weekand I can get until Saturday. So I'm make an appointment. I'm goingto come into noon on Saturday. Will guess what, on Tuesday I cansend them a video of, you know, a happy client that bought a carfrom me. On Wednesday, I can send them a special report aboutthe seven things that you need to know when buying a pre own truck ora new truck. On Thursday, I could send them a quick video ofme sharing, you know, three seek three awesome secrets about the brand newtwo thousand and fifteen. It just came in on Friday. So by thetime they come in on Saturday, there they already know you, they've seenyour voice, they've read your stuff, like they are so stoked to like, I get to hang out with this guy, you know, because he'sthe guy, right. How much does that change the buying experience of theperson versus you going in meeting someone cold at the front door who maybe youdon't get along with, he doesn't understand you, you know, is itthe front lines? Look, and I understand that they're still going to bepeople like that. EXT You're hiring new sales reps. I totally get it, but but that's a what percentage of that is your business vers what percentagecan you pre indoctrinate, preframe? You know, it's like match making,right, you're like Matchcom you know, because what you should be doing.So you get off right on that first date and you create the marriage,which is a soule car and that's what this whole process can do for you. Now, let me ask you this because as you were explaining this sequence, I'm, you know, and I'm...

...sitting here taking notes. It's nosecret those those listening and they know that I write a million pages of notesper episode. But do you think that this sequence that you talked about,which ultimately is qualifying this customer to a higher degree than maybe if they wereleft to their own devices, do you think that this is ultimately why,when customer shows up at dealership, that there's that perception that the customer onlycares about price? And what I mean by that is is if they've alreadybeen qualified to this degree and they've got all of the information they need,then they've kind of arrived at that that place in the buying process where nowthey just want to know what they need to spend to get it. SoI think so. So obviously you're going to have the price shopper right there. There's no way around that. There's going to be someone who, youknow, this is my budget, this is all I can fit into,you know, and and you know, can you make the numbers work?I saw the ad and I saw that you have a car the PHISMIC press. There's still going to be those people, regardless of this sequence, and I'mtalking about today, you know. But there are the people who hadit stuck in their head, and I have a stuck in my head rightnow because I personally want a specific truck, specific model, specific thing, andthe guy that I went to when I just walked into the deer's hip, couldn't tell me anything about the truck. He couldn't tell me about the customizationsthat I wanted, he couldn't talk to me about, you know,just there's some very specific things that I want to know about the truck.And so if I had, you know, someone who handed me a newsletter,if I had someone that said, Hey, you've got to talk tothis guy because he is the truck Guy Right, it would have made thebuy experience that much better. Instead of me leaving a dealership instead of buyinga truck, I had a bad experience with a sales guy. Now Iwrite the whole dealership off, and that's what you're losing by not having thesethese types of sequences and these types of ad campaigns and these types of funnels. They bring people in so that you can teach them these kinds of things. So it is it? Is it a different kind of thinking? Isit is? It may be a little scary. Is it more work,a hundred percent it is. Is it worth the payoff? I truly believeit is. And this is what we do for clients, you know,all over the country and a lot of different feels. Is We create thesetypes of sequences. So they come in and they're like, Michael, I'vebeen getting your stuff all week, I'm super excited. You know, justshow me, you know, you know, you're the expert, so you justtell me what I need to know. Right. It changes the conversation.So now the client isn't in control, you're in control, and when you'rein control it's a hell of a lot easier to sell something. And, and I mean with all of this, it actually goes back to point numbertwo, which is, you know, if they really don't like what you'reating them, it's going to repel them and they probably weren't the rightcustomer for you in the first place. Yeah, yeah, you're going towaste six hours on a lot when them get to the paperwork and they weregoing to walk right and even more that they do. Even if they doin up, they're going to think it's going to be low gross. Theywe're going to probably be bet give you bad CSI customer survey and then probablynot go out and tell everybody how great you are, but one another.What I wanted to add and ask into that is when doing this type ofmarketing or this type of approach, is it? First off, it's gotto be easier to create the message because, like you know, if you're creatinga message just for f one hundred and fifty individual customers or prospects,that you know how to speak to them. Second what about, like you know, cost is it's I mean it obviously should be easier to to youknow, when you know who you're looking forward to target. F What peoplelooking for S and it is anybody in Orlando looking to buy a newer usedcar. Oh, a hundred percent. Obviously. Like on a PPC yourad words campaign, then more granular you can get, the cheaper the clicksare right, versus just Orlando car dealer or Orlando Ford. It's much easierto, you know, have a keyword, you know on an Adword side for, you know, Orlando Ford, F one hundred and fifty, sexto black. You know black on black. You know you're going to be theonly guy advertising for that. You know. And then also if you'resending them to a specific landing page, right, and that landing page hasa picture of that exact truck that the person wants and then they enter theirname and email address to get, you know, a free listing of allthe trucks that they have that fit that qualification and then they get followed upwith a I'm just it is is specific. You're right, message, market match. It's easier to write to that guy, it is cheaper to reachthat guy. It's just it just it...

...opens you up to so much moremarketing that you can do and any the whole thing is just a much bettersituation. So that's the type of world. I mean that's the direction everything's going. It's going to it's a more direct one on one, you know, parking conversations. It's customization, right, everyone wants to feel like they're they'rethe king of the world and you know, in today's world we cando almost anything we want online and get the one specific product that speaks tous. Right. So if you're trying to you know, you know,blankets, sell an entire group of stuff. Well, yeah, you might catchsome guys here in there, but if you can talk to the specificperson about his specific needs at the right time. You know it's a bull'seye and that again, that's a much better client. You want better clients, right. I think we all you know, and it's hard, right, when you go in the end of you you're looking at your under ofthe month statements, you're looking at your sales numbers, you're looking at howmuch this sales guy do versus far online guy versus this guy. It's mucheasier to make a decision say hey, we just need to sell more volumethis month versus last month. That is a much easier decision to make thensaying let's go granular, let's create a marketing campaign for, you know,are the best cars that we sell, the best trucks that we sell,the Best Suvs that we sell, and let's go full court press and focuson a specific market. It is harder to make that decision. But Ithink in the long run, right, if you're not looking month to month, but you're looking quarter to quarter, looking, you know, six months, you're looking twelve months, you're look in the year, two years,three years down the road, it's a much better investment for your money togo and be the experts and it doesn't mean that you can only be thetruck experts right. You can have ten different niches that you go into,write twenty different niches that you go into for one dealership. It is thebetter long term play, but it's a harder decision to make because we alllive in a world of hey, we didn't hit our numbers this month,so let's hit our numbers next month, so let's just do a ton moreof the same marketing that didn't get us the numbers last month. So it'sa much easier decision to make. Is that decision versus the one that we'retalking about here today. And and you know, at and we see thisall the time, like we were, we were talking to a dealership andI think, you know, what did they say, Robert? Something likeFortyzero a month and spend for you know, I can't remember it was. Youknow, it was sad and ridiculous that the amount of money that thatwas being spent to just get such a low well, there was no return. They were pretty much paying people to come and buy cars from them.And and I mean, you know, and it goes goes along with thisold saying that I've learned has been is totally inaccurate. You know, youhear people saying, Hey, well, the money's all green. Well,I've learned that if you're bringing on the wrong customer, the money is notall green, because sometimes you're paying money to have a customer and that's notwhere you want to be either. Yeah, I'd rather have the quality than thequantity all day long. Well, it's there. There's more to itthan meets the eye. Right, because there's bad customers as good customers,but there's good customers who become advocates, who start to refer, who youknow are happy to have your license plate with the you know, the thedealer contact information on the back of I mean there's there's a whole world ofit it. But it starts by bringing in the right guy. Right,you bring in the guy who wanted low price, who got the junker inthe back corner of the lot because you could fit them in and you're willingto cut your prices to that. Well, who is he going to attract?More of the same guy? Right, the guy who is the enthusiast,who was excited to work with you, who had a great experience. Whois he going to attract? Another guy who's an enthusiast, who wantsthe same type of experience. So, you know, you got to thinkabout it from that level, you know. Is What are the long term effectsof this? Rightly not, and I was going to say to sorryto catch you off, is that that that ideal customer, the one thatyou attracted in the first place. It just kind of the spill off ofthat. The snowball effect is that they're going to be more likely to refertheir friends who are likely of the same, you know, mindset. Yeah,exactly. And I mean you know a couple dealers that I work with. I mean they are really great at point of sale marketing, right.So when someone comes in, they they the sale happens, they ring theGong or they do whatever they do right, and there's pictures taken and social mediagoes off. And I mean again, who do you want that picture ofthat person ringing the Gong, taking...

...the pictures? Who Do you wantthat to beat? Do you want the guy who bought the junker who beatyou up and you only made, you know, a hundred fifty bucks onthe car, right, or do you want the guy that had a greatexperience, you made some money on the car right, because now he's sharingit and he's going out there and you're sharing it to the world. Butwhose customers are? So really think about that right this it's a whole trustissue because like attracts like, no matter what you do. So if you'reattracting I talk about this, I do a lot of work with financial advisorsand I talk to them all the time that if you are stuck with meetingswith guys that only have a thousand dollars in their savings account, you knowit is because whatever you are doing in your marketing has attracted that person intoyour life. And the adverse, if you're attracting the guy who's got millionsof dollars he's accumulated in his four own case and Iras over the last thirty, forty five years, it's because you've done something to attract that person intoyour life. So the same can be said at your dealership. If youlook around your dealership and you're like, man, there's a bunch of slubsand the office today looking at cars, it's because your marketing attracted the schlubsinto your dealership to look at the cars. If there's a bunch of affluent,happy, smiling families all buying Sixtyzero cars. Is Because you did themarketing to attract them right. I know inventory plays a role in this.I know I'm simplifying things, but if you look around your dealership and who'sbuying cars, who's looking at cars, who's walking away, you, asthe the owner, you as the the marketing manager, you attracted them toyour dealership. You did that right. Your ads did that, your headlinesDid that, your inventory did that, all of the things that you havedone have attracted the people into your dealership. If you want to change who's inyour dealership, change the things that brought him there right. Change theinventory, change you know, the the message, change the headline, changeyou know, and that will attract a completely different type of person. So, man, that kind of reminds me of Gosh, now I'm now,I'm going to make up who said, but I'm pretty sure Brian Tracy said. You know, if you want the things in your life to change,you need to change the things in your life right and it people think ofthat and they go, well, what the heck does that even mean?But it's so true what you're saying right now. If you want to aattract different people, you need to change. You need to change who you're speakingto. And and we see this all the time. I mean that. I call it picture and price advertising, where you pick up like a buyand sell or one of those penny rags, and all it is isseventy two pages of dealership advertising, and it's nine, nine photos of carson a page with their corresponding price and the most captivating taglines like air tilt, cru's local one owner. I can't even say that without chuckling because it'sso bad. But I mean, but, but really. And then you takethat online and that's the way they're they're using their website, they're makingit all about picture, price and and then they sit here and wonder,and they, I mean Robert, don't know the terms that that are usedmost frequently out there, but they'll go man, that guy stiffed us,or they're just here doing this and they're wasting my time and all this kindof stuff. While it's it's true what you're saying, it's like, wellthen then, why did you spend the money, a which boggles my mind, on attracting them to your store in the first place and be why didyou waste so much time once they got there if they weren't who you reallywanted? Yeah, so to two things kind of to that real quick.I was trying to make notes, so I remember what the two things whereI said to things and we'll remember one of them. But with that,it's okay to advertise in some of those rags because you're going to pick upsome in the Tory right of people trading in cars. You're going to maybe go to an auction and get some stuffed. I totally I totally getit. But that should be a channel. That should be a vertical, justlike selling your high end is a vertical. So trucks is a vertical. Your cheapo trade cars is a vertical. You should trade it the same way. You should have someone who specializes in that and pay him nice becausehe's got a deal with the people that come in from that. But havesystems to work those cars, just like you have systems to do the highend trucks, R Sev's, like I was talking about right. So thatwas kind of my first comment. Is I get the picture price side ofthings, but work it just like a channel, as if it were ahigh end right. So it's same opt in, same lead, same strengyou're just sending them different things. Those people it's more about the credit andgetting them approved, and you know that whole side of things, versus thehere's all the features and here's how awesome...

...your life going to be when you'redriving the porst down the road. Right. So it's just different funnels. Thesecond piece that I wanted to talk about is that you can't assume thatyour your prospect that's coming into the dealership is an expert in the car,right just because they read a couple things online about it or they say theythink it's a cool looking. So that's me, right, I just wantto truck because it's cool looking. I don't know a freaking thing about it, right. I didn't go to school to learn about cars. I didn'tgo to school to learn about engines. I didn't go I don't work everysingle day to know about horse power in this and that and what it meansin safety features and all that. Just like if you went to the dentist, you have no freaking clue what he's doing to your teeth. You justwant to walk out with white teeth, right. So, but you wantto trust that your dentist went to dental school and he got is, youknow, dental degree and he got all his certifications and he's board certified,he's got his you know. But you want to trust your dentist right thathe's going to take care of you when he sticks that stuff in your mouth, because I didn't go to dental school, I don't know what he's doing,I don't know what he's recommending, but there's a trust there because he'sa doctor. Right. You have to try to create that same kind oftrust as a sales person in the car world that a dentist has to createor that a financial advisor has to create, or that a doctor or a personaltrainer is subsitute any business. You got to do the same thing becauseyou can't assume that your consumer, your customer, your prospect, knows anythingabout what you do, because they don't. They even know clue what you know. Right. But the trick is, and this is like the million dollarquestion, is how do you not come off like a sleazy, slimysalesperson, which is what so many people think of, you know, carssales reps, and I again I'm stereotyping I know a lot of people thatlisten to your show, our great stand up people, but you really gotto think of it that way. Is, how can I be the doctor who'sprescribing something that they're really going to listen to? Like, if adoctor gives you a prescription, you're going to freaking take it right, butif a car you know, if you're a car salesman and you make arecommendation, is your prospect going to take that recommendation? Your goal is tomake sure that they take it. And it's this the marketing strategies that we'vebeen talking about, it's the positioning that we've been talking about, it's thepre indoctrination that we've been talking about. Is the expertise that helps on theprocess. Is it flawless? Is it perfect? By no means is itflawless as a perfect but it will position you again to where you have thecontrol in the relationship because the prospect trusts you at some level. I don'tknow, man, I'm sweating because I've been taking notes so fast. Youknow, so many power bombs here about how you can build trust through doingthe right marketing and, more importantly, how you can how you can attractthe right customers to your dealership. And I love what you're talking about usingusing different, you know, I guess, advertising or marketing mediums as a differentvertical to kind of get you a different objective. And I think that'skind of the operative word is, before you jump in and start spending moneyto do any of this stuff, because you need to identify what your objectivewas in the first place. Yeah, man, it's all about strategy,right, and no one wants to strategize. They just want to sell cars andtheir guests and and and as a result, I mean we see itall the time and it's evident that there's a lot of guesswork happening, there'sa lot of gut decisions being made and ultimately, dealers are spending more thanI think they have to to to get the results. Yeah, a hundredpercent. What's crazy is that that is actually in front of them right.Most dealer owners or general managers, you know, sales managers, they havethe data right in front of them. How many trucks do we sell lastmonth? It's right in front of them. You know and you know. Soit's not like you have to go digging for a lot of this stuff. But you do have to pay attention, you have to be, you know, smart about what you're doing. But you know, it's not likeyou know, I talked to a lot of clients and they got it.They have no idea who their clients or anything are. I mean you guysin the car business, you do because you see your inventory. It's infront of you every single day. But you're right, there's some strategury thatneeds to take place and you know in the the the hard answer there isthat you need to plan, to plan. So every day, every Tuesday herein our office, every Tuesday we get all the different apartments together,we have a meeting day. God,...

I hate meeting days more than anythingand they also do. I do. But every Tuesday we all get onthe same page and we get our marketing down, we get our promotions downand we get our videos shooting down and we get and it's strategury all daylong. Is Just strategury every single week. And we look at the numbers,we look at sales, we look at trends, we look at optens, we look at, you know, lead capture, we look at well, this program is not selling. Why is it not selling? Oh crap, we didn't do these two or three things that we do for every othercampaign. We have checklists for everything. And does it suck for someone likeme being like a creative person, you know, just writing copy and creatingcampaigns? So it's sure does to sit in a room with like data,but it allows us to make the right decisions. And so, you know, we also like to put our money where our mouth is, and sowe spend a lot of money on advertising. Me Right now we have as anink magazine, Success Magazine, Entrepreneur magazine, every Niche magazine that's outthere right now. I mean, we're putting our money where I'm out this. So it's not like I'm making blind decisions to our clients without saying,Hey, we just tested this in make magazine. That's a thirtyzero dollar amonth. Add that we just, you know, did a full page inyou know, I know it works and what doesn't work, because if Ilose thirty grand I lose my ass, you know, yeah, job.And so you know, we're not making decisions based on, you know,recommendations that are just kind of blind or cold. We test everything ourselves andthen go out there into the real world. I think that's really powerful. PUTThe strateagury part. You got a plan to plan. It's not afun thing to do, at least not for me. I don't know manypeople who love to plan, to plan, and then plan their plan. But, but, but it's got to be done. Does it have tobe a full day every week? I don't think so. Could it beat the bar on Friday afternoon? Maybe, but it's some way, shape orform. You got to be looking at this stuff, because how canyou say, Hey, we want to create an f one hundred and fiftyfunnel if you don't know how many s are selling as compared to you know, your expeditions or your toruses or your fusions or your edges or whatever else? You know, you can only go down that path and again. You'renot going to create twenty one, twenty funnels day one, create one,create one rock star and then, when it works, duplicated, duplicate again. You know, and and and this makes so much sense. I meanwhen you think about it, these these dealerships, I mean most of them, the franchise ones. anyways. These are multimillion dollar corporations. So youknow, ultimately, in an aster of spending big bucks there and they're usedto spending big bucks. But I mean, you don't see a lot of planninghappening, not at least not in this way. And if there isplanning, maybe it's not the right because the right kind of planning, becauseit's not translating to the market very well. It's now it's all, yeah,yeah, it's, it's, it's we're slow, you know, we'renot hitting our goals. You know, right now, in the middle ofthe month, we need to do implement some mail ors or what do wedo right now? That at Geez, that's going to help us up.That make this Saturday great. Yeah, and Greg, you know we've enjoyedhaving you on the show because I'm I think that's really the point. It'snot about the now, and if it is about the now, then it'sabout setting up the right process right now, the right plan, the right strategy, and then executing and duplicating it when it works. Greg thanks somuch for being on the show with us today. So many power bombs.Like I said, I got pages of notes. We appreciate your time andand so glad that we could connect with you. Yeah, man, thiswas awesome. You got me like all rattled over here. Okay, soactually, before we wind this down, I got to ask you. I'mlooking at your bio here. It says Greg as a former RAPP up.What's going on? Rock? He was rapper in a rock band like olympbiscuit type thing. Okay, okay, I can more Lincoln Parky, butyeah, man, we had a we had a we had a heck ofa good time from that time I was seventeen to like twenty three ish towardthe country. I played everywhere from Madison Square Garden and New York City toHollywood Boulevard. Wow. I play with a lot of good bands. Openup for you know, groups like seven dust and Papa Road and Jurek Cherryand Nice folks in the hippos base to I had a had bone thugs andharmony in my dorm room over yeah, recording tracks. So had a greattime, man, and it's the crazy part is it's no different than anythingthat we talked about today. That business. Breaking into that business is the samething. Matches to market, match right music, right marketing, andit got out of the music industry and taught musicians that for a very longtime kind of an information business model and...

...then my partner now nick said Hey, stop selling stuff to musicians and sell stuff to business owners, and itwas. It was a heck of a good transformation. So basically, startselling star. It's selling to people that actually have money. Is that wasthat's a good idea. Yeah, like the brilliant a dude. Dude,I feel you. I'm actually by my formal educations and sound engineering. SoI totally, I totally get where you're coming from. Well, your podcastsounds good, so that you can appreciate it. Hey, man, thanksvery much for me working. Our listeners connect with you at Man. Yeah, so they want to learn more about kind of the direct marketing stuff thatwe do. It's just celebrity expert Marketingcom. They can check some stuff out there. All my contact Infos there, just at Greg Rolette. On allthe social media stuff, twitter, the facebook, the linkedin. I don'tknow how to use Linkedin, but I have one of those. Probably geton that, but Huh, you know any of those places? And obviouslyyou know I'll be checking out your site when you when this episode goes up, see if anybody has comments, things like that, and I'm happy tojust be a part of your community. Sounds Great, man, appreciate youbeing here. Boom, and that was gray rolette. I know he's youknow, a lot of you might not be familiar with him, but again, yet you hear the guys worked with and you know, done some amazingthings. Michael, this was your first interaction, man, I told youthis guy was perfect for that shit. I wasn't kidding, man. Iactually started working up a sweat as I was like trying to keep up writingnotes, because it couldn't have just been me. But that the energy fromfrom Greg is so incredible and there's no mistaking his passion and his level ofconfidence with this stuff, and I mean that that confidence, of course,comes from seeing what he talks about work and, like we talked about inthe preshow man, like, he's worked with so many incredible companies. He'sbeen featured all over the place, and and that's because what he's talking aboutabsolutely makes sense right. It's it's and it's something we talked about on theshow frequently. It's like, Dude, just, you know, speak topeople about something that they're interested in. Really celebritize yourself. We've been talkingabout that and we reference Tracy all the time because Tracy Myers, man,that's his thing, right, just being a celebrity. But but it's also, I mean it's what you did. You celebritize yourself. You were talkingabout all the time. You'd go and do like morning radio shows and stufflike that. Yep, and I wasn't like SPAM E on there. Inever once said I even sold cars or the dealership where I worked at,but I would just go on and, you know, talk about like howto save money on guess this and that and that strategy to get that done, because a lot of your probably like, man, that's a great idea.Same with like your local newspapers. Is, listen, you're closing people, you're closing deals every day on huge transactions. Don't tell me you can'tclose and a local radio show or the local newspaper on. You bring anexpert and why you should be there. And a lot of the stuff Ilearned from Greg, you know, when I was selling is, you know, I took a lot of the strategies that I would get from his podcasthe's had in the past and his blog to help you become that that thatwellknown expert in your market. And what I said in the pre show isthat, you know, he reference and spoke a lot from the dealership pointof view, but I mean from a salesperson. I mean this is justno brainer. You can do this tomorrow, you know. So this stuff isdon't sleep on any of that. That's super valuable stuff. That's that. You know what, the more specialized you are, the less you'll spendand the more people are going to want to work with with you. Yeah, and you know at and and you bring up a good point. Imean, if you want to if you want to really take your career andcar sales to the next level, you definitely need to go to triple wdot, the dealer playbookcom forty, because we've got a resource, they're includedin the show notes, that you really want to be able to check out. I'm talking, you know it what Roberts talking about here. Take yourcar sales career to the next level.

So again, the dealer playbookcom forty. We're also going to link you to all of the resources and things fromthe show that that Greg talked about and he's kind enough said he's going tobe checking in on the comments. So if you have a question about whatwe've discussed in this episode, you need to check out the show notes,where Greg will actually interact with you through the comments. Again, triple wdot the dealer playbookcom forty, and until next time, be great. We'lltalk to you soon. Later.

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