The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 5 months ago

Isaac Brown: How To Perform At Peak Levels, Consistently

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Coach Isaac Brown, a former NFL, and CFL athlete is the strength and conditioning coach for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. He helps his players perform at peak levels both on and off the field by developing healthy habits and routines. 

In this episode, Coach Isaac shares his wisdom about the importance of creating healthy habits in routines. As you listen, consider how you can apply what you hear to the context of your circumstances within your career in the retail automobile industry. 

Noteworthy topics from this episode:

2:05 - Success leaves clues.

5:42 - What is it like being a professional athlete?

10:14 - NFL to CFL: what do you think contributes to the difference in mindset and culture?

13:12 - Is your level of discipline something you were born with or have developed?

16:17 - How did you find your passion?

21:45 - As a leader, how do you cater the training to the individual?

23:50 - How do you stay disciplined as a leader?

27:13 - Should leaders roll up their sleeves and participate in business operations?

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Hey, before we hop into this episode,let's talk about why your website and digital presence isn't working now. Iknow what you're thinking, Michael, we talk all about the web sites all thetime. You talk about the websites, the websites, a hammer, yada yada yada, weget it. But for real though, it's shocking to me how much guesswork stilltakes place and how its having a detrimental effect on whatopportunities you are able to leverage now over the last decade, especiallyfor the O. G. D. P. Beers. You know, I've poured my soul into assembling ateam that cares deeply about the progress of the retail auto industrythat believes in my mission to enrich and empower dealers to perpetually grownow. I'm making my amazing marketing team accessible to the dealer playbookcommunity so that you can start to thrive rather than merely survive.Right now, we're providing a just for you free website diagnostic that willshow you exactly what you need to do in a priority sequence so that you canfinally get the answers you need claim yours by visiting triple W dot flexdealer dot com forward slash website audit. That's triple W dot flex dealerdot com forward slash website dash audit. Welcome welcome to this episode of thedealer Playbook, a podcast that explores what it takes to create athriving career right here in the retail auto industry. I'm your host,Michael Chiarello, delighted to be joined by coach Issac braun. This dudeis crazy when it comes to morning routines, discipline and acceleratinggrowth. Mhm. Well, it should come as no surprise my beloved DPB gang that humanbeings you're listening. Human beings are creatures of habit. Even not havinghabits is a habit when you really think about it. Uh So have you ever heard thesaying? Success leaves clues. I first realized the depth of that message.Okay, success leaves clues. I first realized the depth of that message as Iwas overcoming severe suicidal depression. You've all heard about thatbefore. I don't want to dig into it any further. But at the beginning of my mymy path of you know life, personal spiritual professional development, Inoticed I learned that success leaves clues and that led me to observing,studying those who had achieved the things that I was hoping to achieve inlife and guess what? They definitely follow certain patterns. I recognizethe more I hear the same message from those who have achieved higher levelsof success in life, that there are definitely patterns. One pattern thatI've observed that I observed early on rather is that that that there isimportance in developing a morning...

...routine and routines in all facets ofyour life, personal spiritual career that will help um help us understand that accelerated growth can happen andwhen I say accelerated because it can happen faster than you probably everimagined. Coach Issac Braun, a former NFL and CFL athlete as a life coach andtrainer for the Hamilton Tiger Cats and we're talking some Cfl action for allof those of you. Listen from across the pond, that's Canadian football. Dare Isay? The only football being in Alberton being being from Canada. Idon't know, I don't know if I can go that deep. Not only does this dude havethe physique of like the Mighty 300, but to me what I observed from that isit's a demonstration of his adoption of healthy habits and routines, it's ademonstration of his ability to help others achieve that success because heunderstands the discipline and leadership by example that is requiredand that's exactly why I'm excited to introduce you to coach Isaac Brown, myman, thanks so much for joining me on the podcast. Thank you for having me,I'm excited bro, I've been scrolling up and down your instagram and I'm like ifif only I could have arms that looked like that, oh they're not how they usedto be, hey you're you're not how they used to be, is my aspire to be. Okay,so so but but but the reason I I kind of pitch you that way, the way that thereason that I I wanted to put that in the intro is because there's there's nothing worse thanhearing about healthy habits and morning routines and discipline fromsomebody who's got like Cheeto dust on their T shirt Dorito dust Yeah and andhow can you live in, how can you be a trainer to professional footballplayers? If you're sitting there like yourbelly's hanging out over your pants, your muffin top in it, you're likeyou're not living it, they're sitting there running drills and you've got aWendy's bacon nater and you're you can't, you can't, but I want to ask youbecause like look, I don't I don't get many professional athletes on the show,so I just got to ask you, I know you probably get asked this all the time,but just for the sake of tickling my fancy, what what is it like being a pro,like, you know, working so hard, you know, high school college all of asudden NFL and cFl like you you didn't just play in one pro league, you playedin two pro leagues. Like what is that like being a professional athlete? Oh it's uh it's different for everyone,you know, it's I think it really your your personal experience outside of,you know, the way the business is,...

...which is there's a bit of pressure,always competition, you know, fame, all those things, but your personalexperience, it really depends on the the pedestal that you give that sportin your life, you know, and you know, some, some guys that's their identityand I was one of those guys at a point in time and some guys that's just anexpression of their identity and some guys, that's all they have, you know,so it varies from person to person. But for me, I'll tell you, I had I playedin two different leagues and I had to completely different experiences when Igot to the NFL, which was my childhood dream, who that's any football player,that's what you want to do, you want to get to the NFL and that was the goal,that's what I wanted. But when I got there I was not happy, I was not happy man. It was, it was notall it was cracked up to be because my experience was not A very pleasant one.I didn't, I didn't experience what I thought I would, I thought it would bewhen you get there, you're going to be famous, you're making millions ofdollars and all these different things. But my experience went like this freeagent, going into the Atlanta falcons, not much help from the older guyshelping out a young rookie, an injury happens and I'm just ready to get outof there. That that was my NFL experience. Now when I got to the yeah,now when I got to the CFL my experience went like this Rookie, three hours away from home, youknow, in a brand new country that I had never spent more than a couple hours injust driving through, going to buffalo to wash my uncle play. But major loveand welcoming from the older players, there was no sense of insecurity fromthe older players in this league, they welcomed me, they taught me the ropes,they basically showed me how to take their job. That was the difference.When I went to the NFL, it was a scarcity mindset amongst the older guysand there was no help, but when I came to the CFL it was more of a abundancemindset even though no, there's not enough for everybody, somebody's got toget cut, but they didn't, they didn't approach it like that, they taught meeverything I needed to know and I will never forget that experience and when Ibecame a vet on the team, that's how I treated rookies coming and try to getmy job. So that's that was my experience and you know, the fan loveand playing in front of thousands of...

...people, that's always amazing. But thethings you never forget are the interactions you have with yourteammates man and you know what? It's crazy because I remember years ago,like I'm a homeboy, you know what I mean? Not not in the sense of likestreet, but like, I like to support the fact that we have our own footballleague in Canada. You know, when I was in Australia, um I was speaking at anevent in Australia, my wife and I went to the South Sydney Rabbitohs rugbygame and seeing the pride of like these people are literally on it. It's not anisland. I mean, I think we regard it as a continent now, but they're in themiddle of nothing. There is ocean on all sides. And the pride of like themjust cheering on their team. And it's not big. Like the NFL, it's not big.Like major league baseball is not big. Like, you know how everything in theStates is so massive. But I love the fact that 25 minutes from my house,there's a stadium and I can go see the Edmonton Eskimos play a game and feelthat energy and that hype. And like, so I love the fact that, that also you'renoticing differences going from CFl, the NFL or from NFL two Cfl rather. AndI was gonna say, is that a Canadian thing, But I don't think it is becausethere's a lot, I mean you're american, there's lots of americans playing inthe Canadian league. So what do you think contributes to that difference inmindset and culture? Oh man. I honestly, I think it'sbecause we're a smaller leak and we're a smaller community Uh, in the NFL,there's 32 teams up here. There's when I played, there was eight, now there'snine. Um, and it's, it's just a, it's a smaller community and you know, it'slike real, recognize real. I come in, they know the struggle, they know howit was when they were rookies. And you know, I'm not saying that every NFLteam, it's like that and again, that was my personal experience. Maybe Ijust wasn't in the mind frame. But again, that was my experience, you know?Well, I mean, you know, yeah, go ahead. Sorry. There was one guy that did helpme out tremendously and he had a connection with me. He, it was lawyerMalloy and lawyer Malloy was a rookie on the new England Patriots while myuncle was a veteran on that team, In that, while that was in 97 or 98, so Iwas 13 years old, and then here I am, 22 years old on the same team with him,right, that was crazy. And he was like, I'm gonna help you out because you know,your I know your uncle and blah blah blah, and he he gave me some advice asfar as my injury went, you know? But other than that man, once I got injured,I felt completely alone. I didn't have...

...much wow support or help, you know, itwas it was a tough time. It was a tough time. All right, so this I've got allthese thoughts going in my head and I'm already seeing so many parallels tolife, spirituality, business. Um you name it obviously those that arelistening are are in the trenches every day trying to build their business. Um, you know, the thing that stands out tome is you said get into the NFL was your dream and I mean, anybody can goonline and see your college record, your high school record, they can seeeverything in order to get that good to even be attracted, like, to have aleague be attracted to you, whether free agent or draft picture or not,you've had to be extremely disciplined. Your entire life was a morning routine, something that you adopted early on, um, or, or like, where was your mindsetat? Like, how do you, how do you actually as a teenager? I think aboutmyself as a teenager, I didn't want to do anything, you know, like I justwanted to, you know, hang out with girls and play my guitar and stuff likethat, but like, to, to, to show that level of discipline, is that somethingyou're, you think you were born with, is it a muscle you learn to develop?Like how did that, how did that play out for you? That's something that I definitelydeveloped. Um and I developed it and uh for two reasons one was for,because of passion to be great and the other was from doing things I loved, sothe passion to be great was obviously, you know, I wanted to get up early andwork out because I felt like No one else was doing that, I felt like I wasgetting an edge, But before I started getting up early to work out, I didn'tstart lifting weights until I was 12. But before that, as far as I canremember, I would get up in the morning At least maybe two or three days a weekand go fishing with my grandfather and my father and we would leave anywherebetween 5:36:30 a.m. And back then. That, that's super early for a youngboy growing up. So getting up in the morning to do something that I lovedwas it was pretty easy. Now I didn't start consistently getting up andtraining early in the morning until it was it was time for me to go to collegebecause before that, you know, I'm in high school, you got to go to school inthe morning, All that stuff and everything else was taken care of itwhen when I needed it for my own motivation. That was when I started toseparate myself. I I still remember, you know, our workouts in college willbe at six a.m. Sometimes five a.m. And...

I remember getting up early enough so Icould walk or or drive over to the stadium and be there before anyone elsebecause I wanted to be there first. Number one as a leader and I wanted tobe alone. I wanted to get in there and get my mind right before anybody elsearrived. And those those small muscles that I was working on, those skillsthat I was working, they carry over today, you know, and I didn't evenrealize what I was doing until now nowadays in my life now I realizedthat's what I was doing inadvertently, you know? So now it's it's nothing toget up at three a.m. And you know, I don't even care, you know, because Iknow what I I know what I'm getting up to do right? How do you how do younavigate that when it's something you don't want to do? So like think aboutall these people that are showing up to the J. O. B. How do we shift that? Likewhat do you recommend for shifting it? You spoke about passion and I couldn'tagree more. I think you need to, like when you have passion that helpsdevelop drive and that drive is obviously what's gonna, I guess maybeperhaps give you the encouragement to be disciplined. What about when youhate the J. O. B? Is there a way to find passion to get up and get to it?Even if it's maybe today something you feel like you don't want to be doing orshouldn't be doing or whatever the other excuses might be. Yeah, I find mypassion is is that's the vehicle or the passion is actually the fuel for thevehicle. You know, I've, I've worked two jobs and I did not want to get up,for example, my first two off seasons in theCanadian League, I was broke right, I blew all my NFL money and barely wasmaking anything in the CFL, so when I, in the off season I had to work twojobs, I worked at GNC and I was a bouncer and I had to train, right, soI'm getting back home at three AM because I have to close down the bar,but then I have to get up and train in the morning before I go to GNC for workat eight or 12, I didn't want to do that, I wanted toget up and train and let that be that, but what was the overarching reason? Itwas because of what I was shooting and aiming for, you know, so if you're, ifyou're, you know, on a, on a job that you don't want to work, you got to finda bigger reason to get up and show up and that's just point blank period.There were days that I did not want to get up and show up for work outs, butthe reason I did it was because I wanted to be a great football player, Iwanted to be great, you know, so my, you know, like Ben Newman said mystandard had to override my feelings...

...every single time. So it's a, you got to find something big to pull you, like Daniel said,what's gonna pull you when things can't push you, right? Yeah. You know, I lovewhat you just said, it's something that I believe firmly in and I meanobviously Danielle to add her validation to that whole point I thinkis tremendous um which is, you know, I think I was talking aboutit on club House the other day. Like you have to account for failure, Idon't plan for it, but I have to account for it and perhaps failure inthe moment is knowing that I won't want to get up tomorrow morning yeah,knowing that I won't want to do all those follow up phone calls or prospectfor new customers, I account for it. But to your point, like having a biggerreason why it's crazy man, like if I gave up in the early days of mybusiness because I was doing things that I didn't want to do right. Like II call myself Mr Miyagi sometimes not to anybody realized I was the guy likewhen you own a business you're you kind of have to, oh I'm mopping floors todayand then tomorrow I gotta fix the toilets and then I'm gonna be on asales call trying to close down a million dollar contract. And then I'mback to like putting a hinge on the fence and like, you're doing all thesethings that you don't want to do, but you're right. Like in the back of mymind, I was like, but all of this is a means to an end and I'm, and so itdoesn't matter about what this stuff is right in front of me. It matters aboutwhat the end is that I have in my mind and that that's ultimately what made mewant to show up every, every day for sure. So like stoplights man on theroad, you know where you're going and you know why you're going there. But there are certain laws that youhave to stop and obey in order to get where you're going right. And sometimeswhen we're when we're on our own journey and doing our own things, wedon't want to stop and obey the laws, but thats what separates people who getwhere they want to go and who don't get what they want to go, man. I love that. I'm letting it sink inhere for a minute. Um dang. That's so true. I love that. And that also feedsinto them the discipline part of it because you don't get a physique like Isaac brown by lifting weights once aweek. I mean maybe you do, but it's gonna take you 150 years. Um And so but you also can't train nowother professional athletes, right? Because you're the ru the fitnesstrainer or what are you for the for the Hamilton Tiger cats? Yeah, I'm the I'mthe head strength coach for the thai cats. Now, I can train other athletes in any other league, butwithin our league, anybody that plays...

...on another Cfl team, I can't train them.And also I'm the head strength coach for our pro soccer team too. So anybody,any any other players within the Canadian Premier League can't trainthem because I train the forge, right? So I can train NFL players and N. B. A.And NHL, but cfl and CPL you're locked in thai cats and only you are lockeddown. Um That that's pretty cool though. But you know what comes to my mind isum you know, as I think about the parallels to sports teams and and thebusiness teams um you know, so you're working with individuals, but you'reworking ultimately with the team as a whole. How do you, how do you cater as a leader? How do you cater thetraining to the individual so that it's something that will, you know, resonatewith them because I'm imagining you're having to continually inspire andmotivate and encourage and like how do you do that for the individual? Butalso map that to the collective of the team, because ultimately you have toget the whole team to a certain place, right? How does that work for you? I put it like this, you go to arestaurant, right, And there's how many of us, So let's say you order steak andpotatoes, right? Steak and potatoes is the general meal, but I like my steakrare. You might like yours. Well done, right? So I, I, you know, with our guys,I give a general program in season off season, and from there, I tailorcertain movements to each and to the individual players. For the most partby position is how I usually do it. And then you'll have guys within theposition that have certain restrictions or, you know, some type of injury theymay be coming off of, and that's where you kind of, you give them a specialorder, right? Special order meal type thing. So it's challenging, but I lovethe challenge, but because it keeps, it keeps me on my toes, you know, and it'sthe same with soccer, right? Keeps me on my toes. And I love the fact that in this role, like, I don't thinkthere's any clearer example of this outside of fitness where it would just sound ridiculous inany other context, but if you couldn't catch and also pass back the medicineball, then you failed as a leader, but yet in business, for some reason, it isentirely okay for leaders to not be able to catch. You know, listen withyour business years to catch and then pass back the medicine ball. Um, sowhat does that mean? Like how do you stay disciplined as a leader so thatyou can lead by example, so that your team is never looking at you and beinglike, yeah, but coach, you're sitting there, you know, the bacon eater whilewe're running drills. Yeah, I take the...

...same approach that I took when I was inschool as a player. Like, you know, like I said, I would show up earlybecause as a leader, I told everyone else to show up early, right? I wouldgive everything I had in the drills, I would do exactly what the coach said.So therefore whenever I could, whenever I would see a player talking back tothe coach or slacking off or loaf in, as we call it, I have credibility thatI can go get at his head right as a coach. It's the same thing I am awalking mirror, you know what I'm saying? So I always have to reflectwhat I'm preaching. You know, and a lot of times when I'm, you know, with myguys at the facility, they want to do certain workouts with me, they want meto get in on it, throwing the med ball and you know, so there's certainthere's certain individual players that they helped keep me accountable at alltimes, because when they come in to work out, I know that it's time for meto do something physical with them in their work out, right? And and that'sanother piece that I love about coaching is because it's not just givedirections and watch them follow. It's interactive. It's an it's an actualrelationship. It's not a transaction when they come in and out of the gym,it's a it's a real human interaction where you're doing things with them insteadof just barking directions and then watching them do it, you know, you'reyou're sweating with them, you're bleeding with them. You know, if Icould put on a helmet and get on the field with him, I would do that too.But I'm I'm gonna leave that alone because I'm I'm removed from the game,I'm removed but I'm not removed from the weight room. So that's where Ithat's where I participate with them and it drives them even further. Um Ilove your choice of words, their participation because I think so oftenit's like, oh where's the leader? Oh the leaders up, You see that windowover there, they sit up in that window over there and and then we work insilos, we don't communicate enough and then we're not participating enough. Um,you know, we, we've even had an experience on, in my company, uh,recently where we on boarded a few new team members. That then created morebandwidth for those that have been here a little while, which then ultimatelyit always trickles back up to me and it created more bandwidth for me. But thenthat bandwidth highlighted things that I needed to be doing better as theleader because I'm like, whoa, we're missing. Oh crap. So what do I do? Myfirst reaction is not just just start barking orders. Like you said, it's togo, okay, here we go, let's get in it, let's get our hands dirty. And, and sofrom your experiences, both the coaches, a trainer as a life business coach,motivational speaker. I mean, does that,...

...what's your take on the wholeparticipation thing? Like how, how often? Because I know a lot of leaders areasking this, but how long will I be required to get back into the dirt androll up my sleeves and participate? Mhm I thought I built a business in orderto just kind of check out a little bit. So what's your take on that? My take on it is I'll give you I'll give you two, I'llgive you two, I'll give you my my take on it and I'll give you an example. My take on it is how long will you doit? You'll do it as long as it's important and it's a value to you,that's how long you do it. And here is my example. I brag on our head coach all the timebecause he is honestly he's the best leader that I know walking around rightnow. Honestly, I'm not even going to lie, right? Um, so here's a small example just lastweek. So in our gym and he does things likethis all the time. And it's always it's just who he is, right? But it it rubsoff on you. You know, he's not going to walk past a piece of trash on theground and tell someone to pick it up. If he's going to pick it up, anythingthat he feels needs to be done, he's going to do it. He says it's never yourjob or his job or her job. It's our job. Everyone, it's everyone's job, right?So here's a small example. So in our weight room, I wanted to, you know, create thesethese boxes for foot drills without with our guys. So instead of havingsomeone come in and paint it and have it being permanent on the ground, Ijust decided to tape it, measured it off, taped it on the ground, put tapeon well throughout the week. The tape gets destroyed a little bit because ofthe guys, right? I come in and I was going to replace it on monday I come inand all the tape is redone, you know who this offseason man, thisis the off season, you know, who did that? The head coach, I didn't sayanything, didn't tell me I needed to do it, he just did it. And then he left anote on my desk. He says like your workspace and the weight room isimmaculate, Keep doing great work. It's important to him, right? Andthat's just who he is and he does that type of thing in every area of ourorganization. You know, it's important to him and for me as a leader now now Iwant to do that type of stuff right now, I want to go out of my way to just dosomething that I see needs to be done,...

...not look for whose area it is or whoneeds to do it, just do it, just do it because that's going to create cultureand other people will start doing it, you know, jesus was the example, right?He came and the disciples were waiting outside because no one was there towash, wash their feet, so what did he do? He washed their feet, he didn't golook for some what? No, he said, okay, let me just wash it, you know? So hemodels the example, so you know what I love about that too is like this wholeconcept of like compounding returns because you know, you credit him rightas the head coach, he's leading by example, but then you're going to go and impactsomebody and they're going to probably credit you or if they do or don't itdoesn't really matter. But if it inspires them to go do good, they'regoing to go do it for somebody else who then for that, somebody else you theybecame the source of it. And so you have this never ending domino ofimpacting people and it doesn't matter who the instigator was because also toyour example, you know, like if we pull out just even a little bit and raisethe roof on this thing a little bit, we don't know who impacted the head coachfor him to want to be that way and who impacted that person. Like it it goeson forever. Right? And so the point being, especially for those listening,I want to draw the parallel to what what Isaac saying here, you don't haveto wait for your leader, you don't have to be in the organization and be like,oh well I gotta wait for the business owner to do that. You can be the onethat starts the chain effect, You can be the one and I think what you're saying here isso powerful and what you just said about jesus and like let's be honesthere, like I'm a believer, you don't have to be a believer, you can believein the universe, you can believe whatever it is. The one thing you can'tdeny is jesus is the most famous person that's ever walked the face of thisplanet, 3.6 billion books sold, right. You think that would make him a newyork times bestseller by now? But but the thing is you can't deny that a like perfectparallel man, I'm glad you brought it up. This brings everything full circleAs we wind down the conversation, Jesus had had a mission, he was passionate about something andthen he modeled behavior that he wanted other people to follow and they wentabout doing good and look at what's happened In 2000 years, look at what'shappened, domino effect, domino effect and you'vejust brought it full circle back to this. So whether it's business life,spirituality, the importance of setting up routines and healthy habitsremaining disciplined and then go and have a positive impact on people do.That's what this podcast is all about,...

...it's not about just how many cars youcan sell, you can get that information anywhere, it's about how do I become abetter person that can have an impact and the way that you do that is to bepassionate about something to do what coach Isaac's talked about and see thebigger picture. Have a bigger picture. You think your pictures big now blowthe lid off of that sucker, you're gonna realize you were in a Fedex boxinside of a bigger box and you got to blow the lid off of that box andrealize you're in a bigger box inside of a it's a Russian nesting doll ofboxes that you're in. And when you blow the lid off of all of those, then youcan really start mapping your actions, two habits that are going to accelerateyour growth man, this is I love this conversation bro, I could we could goall day with this one um you know because I'm just so passionate about it,I want to thank you so much for spending your time with me. How canthose, how can those listening get in touch with you and learn more aboutwhat you do? Uh yeah, you can get, you can get in touch with me on instagramat, at coach Issac braun dot not dot com, sorry, that's my website, butinstagram is at coach Isaac Brown and then my website is coach Issac braundot com on facebook Isaac Ike Brown, I put my nickname in the middle um, andthen you know, if you can find me on clubhouse, same thing. Yeah, Isaacproblem. So man, thanks so much for joining me on the podcast. Thank you.Thank you. I appreciate it. I'm Michel Cirillo and you've beenlistening to the dealer playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, pleaseclick the subscribe button wherever you're listening right now, leave arating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make bigchanges in your life and career and want to connect with positive,nurturing automotive professionals, join my exclusive DPB Pro community onfacebook. That's where we share information, ideas and content thatisn't shared anywhere else. I can't wait to meet you there. Thanks forlistening.

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