The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 1 year ago

Jeff Morrill: How This Car Dealer Finds The Right Employees

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Jeff Morrill is the co-founder of Planet Suburu and author of "Profit Wise - How To Make More Money In Business By Doing The Right Thing." He's a successful businessman with investments generating well over $100 Million/year. 

The secret to his success? Finding the right people. He has developed a unique hiring process that involves every member of his leadership team, and, as you'll hear has contributed to a thriving culture and profitability.

Noteworthy topics from this episode:

4:23 - Why is the hiring topic is something you are passionate about?

6:52 - Do you think people’s fear of making mistakes impacts the hiring process?

8:54 - Why is your hiring process is like now and what was it like what you were making your first hires?

19:53 - Encouraging employees to become CEOs of their own lives.

23:47 - What are some of the mechanisms you have in place post-hire that encourage a healthy growth work culture?

27:56 - How to provide a customer experience that keeps the business growing?

32:11 - It is easy to compare your movie to somebody else’s highlight reel.

Fortellis 

This episode is proudly sponsored by our friends at Fortellis. No two dealers operate the same way which is why Fortellis provides the tools to create unique apps that help your dealership meet the needs of the market while catering to your operations. 

Not only has Fortellis created an amazing technology platform that’s designed to make life easier for dealers, but they are also pouring back into the community with events like their dealer dev day. It’s a 3-day event that empowers attendees to network with each other to create smarter, faster, and better apps for the dealer community. 

Visit Fortellis.io to browse their marketplace of apps and integrations that will allow you to run your business, your way.

Hey gang, there are fewer things I regret more than not investing in zoom when I had the chance. How was I supposed to know there's gonna be a pandemic and zoom stocks would explode. Looking back 20 years from now, I don't want to have the same sinking feeling sitting on the sidelines knowing I could have jumped on another bandwagon sooner. luckily we know what the next big boom and retail automotive is and that's why companies like four telus have provided the tools to create unique apps that will help your dealership meet the demands of the market. You see no to dealers operate. The same way the beauty about four tell us, is that you can pick and choose the apps and workflows that help you meet the demands of the market while catering to your operations, not only is foretell has created an amazing technology platform that's designed to make life easier for dealers. They are pouring back into the community with events like their dealer DVD. It's a three day event that empowers attendees to network with each other to create smarter, faster and better apps for the dealer community. So my beloved DPB gang, the best thing that you can do right now is visit the four telus marketplace and browse through their growing library of apps and integrations that will allow you to run your business your way, visit four telus dot io to learn more. That's four tell us dot I o welcome welcome to this episode of the dealer Playbook, a podcast that explores what it takes to create a thriving career right here in the retail auto industry. I'm your host, Michael Cirillo, excited to talk about how to find the right people that will help grow your dealership business with none other than Jeff moral. All right gang. It's no secret that the turnover rate within the retail auto industry is pretty darn high. In fact, I purchased a vehicle about a year ago at the time of releasing this episode. And sadly none of the staff that helped me with the purchase work at that store anymore. Lord knows where they are. And by the way, I'm not just talking sales person. I'm talking about. The sales manager is not there anymore. The finance manager is not there anymore. I called recently and asked for one of the most helpful people that helped me with that purchase. They're not. Nobody knows where they are. But why do I bring this up? Because it doesn't need to be that way. My beloved DPB gang. Are you hearing me? It's why we speak so much about the importance of culture, leadership in helping each other grow before marketing and sales software and widgets. It's the people that make this industry great. And whether you want to believe it or not, that's the way it's going to continue to go. Sure, we got self driving cars and people we want to inhibit, you know, inhabit mars, but guess what? We're going to inhabit mars...

...with people, people, you hear it, you're picking up what I'm putting down. So in the meantime, perhaps we can dissect the hiring process so that we can each find and retain people who desire to grow, who are innovative, who bring their best each day, who are on a mission to provide the best service humanly possible for the people who are opening their wallets and giving us their hard earned dollars, the customer. I'm so glad to be joined by the co founder of Planet Subaru and author of profit wise, how to make more money in business by doing the right thing. Jeff moral is a successful businessman with investments generating over 100 million in annual revenue, 100 millie's. Okay. You understand what I'm, what I'm saying here, Jeff man, thank you so much for joining me on the dealer playbook podcast. Yeah, I'm glad to be here and I feel at home among audience, the listeners who are familiar with the auto business and I'm looking forward to talking with you today. I, I gotta, I gotta know because it's not every day that you talked to somebody that's generating 100 million in annual revenue from, from the business and trust me, I get it. Money is probably our least favorite thing to talk about, right. But I gotta ask you why with that kind of annual revenue spanning of a miscellany of industries, real estate and, and automotive, Why is the hiring topic? Something that you're passionate about? I think it's the magic that delivered the success that we enjoy today. I wish there were relying on the dealership financial statement that accounted for the enormous losses incurred by having the wrong people or having your good people to part. I don't know what that line would be called, but in the automotive retail world, it seems like we, we obsessively track all sorts of metrics, you know, paper click on our advertising or hours per R. O. That our service advisors are generating, but we can never even begin to capture the size of the costs of not having the right people doing the right thing with the right tools. And we certainly didn't at the beginning. I mean, the hiring process that we'll be talking about today that we developed was very iterative and it was designed basically in response to all the mistakes we kept making. So I'll give you an example before we dig in too deeply. But we used to do one interview and then we realized pretty quickly that that that just wasn't enough to get to get deeply invested in the person's ability to To really be on our team and serve as well. So we had a...

...second and we ultimately even add a third. So at each turn over the course of hiring several 100 people over the last 20 years, we got a little better and they were still improving. As recently as a few weeks ago, we were developing a new process for interviewing our apprentice technicians because we had a little more turnover among them last year than we thought was appropriate. And and we dug in and said, how can we, how can we reduce this? I love that. The first thing you say is it was an iteration. Like we keep iterating based on, you know, the lessons we've learned are the mistakes that we've made. And I'm sure you've seen it. In fact, I could assume for sure that you've seen it. People are just afraid of making mistakes. Do you think that contributes to not iterating on the hiring process? Yeah. I mean, I think whether we enjoy making mistakes or not, we just do a lot of them. And Paulo cuello and author said that a mistake that occurs more than once as a decision and that really stuck with me because I realized that, you know, we we flub up all the time. I mean in our personal lives, in our business lives, I mean mistakes are just part of being human. And and the question we've got to ask ourselves is, what are we gonna do about it? Do we want to minimize those for the benefit of the institution or the benefit of our personal life? Or do we want to just keep accepting them? And, and for me, they're just too painful to continue and we'll never eliminate it. I mean, we have turned out like I'd love to tell you we have zero turnover that everyone that joins us stays with us to retirement. That's not the case. You know, for us, the exercise is how do we keep driving that percentage down every year? I love that. Um, and it's so funny that you bring up that quote because just a few days ago, somebody else said that quote and put it back on my radar after having not heard it for quite some time. And so I think it's so, um, I don't believe in coincidences. I believe in divine design. And I just think it's so interesting that here we are, having a conversation where you're sharing that quote with me around a topic that I think is so fascinating and one that we ought to be paying attention to. I love that you're drawing attention to the fact that you are continually examining this hiring process. You said that, you know, we're looking at how do we keep that number going down? Down down? So it sounds as though you're coming up with constant thesis statements of okay, well if we added this or tweet this, perhaps that would create a decrease in turnover. But I want to ask you this going back if you can bring me back to when you were just doing one hiring interview. Can you give, can you give me some insights into what that interview was like and...

...what you observed that made you want to create a second round of interviewing. There's an incident, I described it in the book that I remember painfully and vividly because it mattered a lot at the time that the cost of the mistake was high that we interviewed or I interviewed only, I was the only person involved and interviewed a man to join our sales department very soon after we opened and we needed to scale up very quickly. The dealership that we bought was bankrupt. Super super dealership was in Norwell massachusetts at that time we since moved it to hand over, But we need people, we needed them fast, we need good people and, and I relied on my intuition and spent, I don't know, 45 minutes or an hour talking about hobbies and pets and you know, where he had worked before gaining almost nothing of value from the conversation. I offered him a job on the spot. What I realized later when he didn't show up on the appointed day and just ghosted me was that he was probably too nervous to to know what to do. He probably wasn't ready to commit to accepting the job on the spot and just said yes and whatever his reason didn't follow up. So we had we really needed that person and we didn't have him. And and I started that was probably the first incident. I remember where I said, OK, well what went wrong and what can we do to prevent this particular mistake? Like I knew that it was gonna take a long time to to develop an entire process, but I was very focused at that time. How can we just not do this again? So that was the occasion when we added a second interview. And I think maybe simultaneously we also involve more people. I think I I started introducing candidates to my brother, even as busy as he was at the time, you know, just starting up a business, I made him, you know, I got at least a half an hour out of them to sit down with candidates, and then that would later become our entire management team in the department to meet the candidates. And and later after that, now the entire department meets a candidate on the third day. So let me just back up and give a little context before I close my mouth on this particular question and that that the first interview for us now is usually with one or two managers, just to assess whether the person can meet that minimum threshold to merit the additional investment of resources in trying to find out whether the person is really suited for the job. The second interview if they pass the first is introduces a different slate of managers, maybe even from a different apartment. Like if we're hiring a technician, we might invite the parts manager to participate because the parts manager needs to, needs to have input on the person that he'll be working with. Um in our case it's a he our service manager is a woman right now, but when I say he and then the final day, The uh we call a...

...shadow day, that's the opportunity for the person to spend the whole day with us. So in the case of let's say an automotive sales person, that person is going to join us on Saturday, come in at 10, hang around the showroom, eat lunch, interact with all the people in the department that he or she didn't already meet. And and that's the the chance for our people to get a to get an introduction to that person and the opportunity to ask whatever questions we want to know the from our team side. And also it gives an opportunity for the candidate to ask the questions he or she really wants to know about the position that maybe he or she was afraid to ask during the more formal interviews. And that day has really reduced the number of quick departures after hiring. It's solved pretty much that problem where people would join the team and then within a week or three weeks or three months say, hey, this is, this is not exactly what I thought it was gonna be. You guys are real nice and I like your model here, but it's just not for me. So those three interviews um together comprise the heart of the process, wow, I I actually wrote down, wow exclamation point in my notes here, because you just touched on something this shadow day really intrigues me because too often we rush through this hiring process. We think a body is better than nobody, but really we're trying to get through to that right individual who not only sees fit with the company, but that the company sees a fit with and what you just touched on, like giving them an opportunity, giving the candidate an opportunity to experience the culture, to experience their potential teammates to ask them questions is a huge testament. Two demonstrating transparency in my mind because I can have a job posting all day every day that says great culture, great experiences, We have fun. We this we that but who better to sell that into reality than the people they're going to be working with every day. Because, let's be honest, we know employees talk to each other if they're burdened by something, they're going to verbalize it to their coworkers. If they're, you know, if they're happy, they're also going to verbalize it. Um, so I think that's so tremendous. Is that something that you um put, would put in a job post? Like, hey, this, this is what the process looks like if you want to come work with us or when you apply. So great, thank you for asking that because let's go back upstream a little bit. You know, we're kind of in the middle of the process. I think hiring begins even at the division level for a company to decide the kind of people that the company wants to attract and then that moves in terms of how you're going to...

...phrase the text and the recruiting ad. You know, if you want to use the term sales ninja, you're going to get a different kind of candidate, then then what we use, which would be something like, you know, there's no experience required. We invite people who have an interest in sales to check us out. So, so the language of the recruiting ad has as you know, a significant impact on, on how you communicate with people just to go down a quick rabbit hole. I think in so many cases, businesses forget that the candidates a really big part of the hiring process, like it's just not all about us. We need to make sure the hiring process is designed to make the candidate of partner along with us because we really, as I mentioned before those, those departures, I don't want someone that's going to stay with six months we try to hire to retire, so we want to find people that are gonna help us weed themselves out if they're not right and and we can only see so much over the course of three interviews and some interactions via email and phone calls in between. We need the candidate to to really understand what they're coming into so that they can help us, you know, make a good decision. So so to come back out of that rabbit hole, let's go back to the process itself after we run that ad. And uh I should mention we use uh the text of our ads is on my website. You have moral dot com. So if if you have listeners that are interested in seeing the way we write our ads, then then you know it's all all free and available there. But we we invite applicants to email a cover letter and resume. And we're much more interested in the cover letter than we are in the resume. And it's not that we don't care what they've done because it's relevant. But the cover letters, the opportunity for a candidate to distinguish him or herself. And in if he or she doesn't even attach a cover letter, that's pretty powerful statement that they didn't take even the minimum level of interest in. Following are pretty simple instructions to join us. And sometimes we get people that will say things like I did research about your company. I called um a family member who had bought a car from you. I spent an hour and a half on your website and we'll identify the things in our company values or the the approach we take, the culture or or sales model. They'll actually call those out and identify them as reasons for applying. And that person rises to the top of the pile. Even if they don't have the experience that, that you would hope that they would give, we'll take a college grad that's never sold anything. Um, Who would, who would send us a cover letter like that compared to someone who's been selling car for 15 years. You know, probably the wrong way at the risk of...

...importing bad habits to our company. So anyway, to, to finally get to the specific question you asked when we receive that cover letter and resume, we respond with a list of frequently asked questions this list on my website too. You can see exactly what what we send back. That has all this information, what the process is. Like, who you'll be meeting with, how many interviews there are, what we expect you to do. It as our mission statement as a company. It talks about the compensation, some detail about the pay plan, the hours involved and again we want that candidate to be a partner with us in this process. And the more we can educate the candidate upfront, the less likely we are to have to spend a lot of effort later explaining all this stuff and the last risk there is that the person ends up quitting because they didn't really know what they were getting themselves into. Yeah, I think this is tremendous and um all of that to to suggest also for those listening that this um demonstrates upfront that they are about to enter growth environment, an environment by which leadership is concerned about their growth. And if if you've taken the time to detail to this extent what the hiring process is going to look like for them and they don't even work for you yet. Imagine the signals that that is sending to the candidate about what they can expect post hiring, that you are concerned about their growth, that there will be milestones and goals that you collectively work on. You use the word partner a couple of times and I pick up on that, which is vastly different than employee. A team member. No, you're you're a partner here. And, and I think that just that sends a signal of itself that while you will work within this environment, we are encouraging you to be the ceo of your life. Sure enough, I think there's so much competition for the best people to that. We need every opportunity to differentiate ourselves and and for the people listening, you know, they have a responsibility to communicate In every way they can, why someone should work for them instead of responding to the other. Gosh! In the Boston area 25 solicitations for for sales people. I mean it's just competitive out there for talent. Even even during this covid here where we're talking now with unemployment higher than it was pre covid. We're still still trying to to work. I mean we really have to work hard to find, find good people and it's hard to say credibly to someone we care about you as a person joining our company unless you can find a way to really communicate in terms of how you're treating them. How does um I've learned that. I mean we're talking about hiring but I'm taking notes about...

...leadership here. Um Recently a friend of mine reached out and said and this was on linkedin and they asked me in a direct message what my opinions were about how to determine if the leadership at an organization is worth following. Before even going through the trouble of applying to work there. They were looking at making a career shift and they asked me who I believe so deeply in leaders. Leadership and I believe that the best way perhaps to determine if the leader is worth following is because they don't create followers, they create more leaders, right? Um and so that was my opinion. But everything that you're talking about here is a testament to leadership. Why would I even care about creating a hiring process? This is one of those things that it's like, I just turn on the turn on the the ads and let's see who we get and then we gotta get five sales people on the floor. So let's get that. And we got to do this and now we got to make up for it and then we don't do training and we don't do anything like this is a leadership thing, in my opinion, it's also a culture thing. But circling back to something you said earlier, Jeff, which has fascinated me for quite some time, is the fact that I can't see on A P. N. L. The effect of a good culture um in my workplace. I can see that employee a earns 65,000 a year. What I don't see is the cause and the cause and effect of them being unhappy with where they work or being happy with where they work. But we know that that does definitely factor. For example, I I saw I had someone on the show kate Bush who believes in creating happy work environments and she speaks to the importance of creating a culture of or creating an environment whereby employees can be happy because it does have a correlation to um what you talked about, which is profitability. We know that there's a multiple on somebody's salary. So for example, I think she said there's a one point A 1.6 multiple on salaries for unhappy employees. So in other words, if they're making 60,000 a year in salary, we know that due to inefficiencies, how slow they are, how on, you know, unbuttoned they are that that $60,000 employees actually going to cost you almost 120,000 a year just because it takes them so much longer to do stuff and they're not doing it right and they're making mistakes. But the same is also true if they're happy, you actually decrease that, you know, because you're getting so much more out of that individual. Can you speak to some of the mechanisms you have in place post hire that encourage a healthy work culture or a growth culture?...

Yeah. You know as you're, as you're talking I'm reminded that those words by Bruce Cameron that not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts. I think there are some things in business that there will calm intangibles that are really important to the success of the business but are are just, they're just no metrics that up for them and I'll give you an example. Um you know, we have we're very well run dealership I'd like to think but but you know we're not perfect and of course and recently we had a long time technician leave and during the exit interview, one of the things, it wasn't the only reason he left, he was a great technician and almost cried when he left because he was such a such a planet person. But one of the things he said is that he was very neat and tidy and he left her a dealership that had just been renovated and he said you know it just I just didn't like coming to work every day with everything so messy. And so we went out in the shop and we looked around my managing partner dale and I and we walked around we're like wow you know this our facility is now about 20 years old and we did some light renovations to the shop some years ago but it was just dirty and so what we've done is we've we're going to replace up to eight ft the you know from the floor up to eight ft with diamond plate which is like jury to technicians. I mean that it's gonna when it's all done it's gonna be um it's gonna be beautiful and we didn't do that for the customers. You know, there are things we do to upgrade our facilities for customers. This wasn't for the customers. And and we're doing some other renovations. We're adding some lifts and making the facility run better for our technicians. Because we want to make sure that it feels like the major leagues for everybody coming to work every day. And if you're playing for the boston Red Sox for instance, you don't go into a dirty locker room. I mean when you walk into the locker room at Fenway stadium, I mean it looks like you're in the major leagues and that's that's kind of facility we want to have for our people and of course for our customers too. So I think it's a million little things. I mean if it was just as simple as writing one paragraph about what you have to do to hang on to your best people or to create a healthy culture. It's it's a million things. It's like I said before with hiring, we we invite the entire team to meet candidates are coming in. So that's that's a message from us to our to our team that we care about their opinions. We want to make sure that people don't just show up. And so there there are things like that. I mean when there when there are issues we try to resolve them. You know, it's just it's it's a very long list I guess culture leadership, you can think of as like brick walls that it's it's a...

...million bricks and you can miss a few. But if you miss too many of the wall falls down. I love that. Um it makes me think of how full circle this all comes because if I am attracting, I love how you say it on your website to what we're trying to convey here is that you can design a magnetic, straightforward hiring system that attracts and retains um, top talent partners, productive teams that share the values, the mission that are innovators that are showing up every day, feeling like what you just said that they've arrived at the big leagues. But then there is a direct correspondence between that too, The experience that your customers are going to have, there's a direct correlation to your employees or your team or your partner's, however you refer to them providing an experience that keeps the business growing. Like this is not one of these pie in the sky things that you're like, okay, well now I just have a great team. That team will in fact translate to profitability. Is that what you've experienced? Oh, absolutely. And as you, you know, at the beginning of the episode where you're describing situations where customer comes back for his or her first oil change and can't find anybody that was involved in the original transaction. I mean that does not increase the likelihood that a customer is gonna send friends or family, Who do they send them to you? Just like go to that building. I mean that's not the way referrals get done, referrals are hey, there's this lovely salesperson at planet Subaru. She's been there 10 years, her name is Lori and I've bought three cars from her and she's wonderful go see her. And that's the importance of creating an environment where your best people want to stay because you get a flywheel effect. You know that the the environment is a positive one for everyone there because you have people that get along and enjoy coming to work. The customers enjoy it so they want to keep doing business with you, which means that your people can earn a really good living and don't want to leave or take their chances trying to make a few bucks more an hour or a few $1000 a year somewhere else. Now, let me ask you this. Obviously what came first? Were you in real estate in telecom and insurance and stuff like that before Planet Subaru or was Planet Subaru? Kind of the catalyst to your, to your portfolio? Yeah, the car business was the first thing I was working at a Volvo dealership out of college because I couldn't find any other job I got, my first job was being a service advisor. So those, that's the skill set that I acquired and my brother completely coincidentally, I won't worry with the story year but unrelated but coincidentally was working for Forward Motor company. So together we said, hey, you've got the wholesale side. I've got the retail side. Let's see if we can, we can do this, that's how we started. And then what I found is that once you have cash flow and it took us a long time to...

...really get the business started, there were a lot of lonely, difficult years in there and, And maybe maybe after 10, 12 years. Finally you get your debt down to a manageable size and you have some cash flow that you can start doing some fun things with. You don't need as much leverage so you're, it's much easier to buy. Uh, excuse me, it's easier to take out loans, it's easier. You have so many more connections. Like the second dealership we bought was on a phone call, our bankers said, hey there these guys are in trouble, you wanna, you wanna jeep dealership, it was that easy. The first one took us years of, of legwork and trying to get people to return our phone calls and and the second one that was a phone call to us and it was, it was put together in weeks, so the more you get a momentum going, but I'll tell you for anybody starting out in anything and I'm experiencing the same thing and publishing, you know, this is my first book and to try to get that free train rolling again, whatever industry you're in that, that first part is a lot of work and I, I really appreciate that you're not sugar coating the journey because especially this day and age, I don't know if you've heard of this new app clubhouse. Yeah, Everybody on this app is a flipping 89 figure entrepreneur and they, I was homeless and then I Signed up to sell things on Amazon and now I do eight figures a year in 18 months and you're like, now that might be true. Um, but then their message just lacks the sincerity of, hey, look, I made a crap ton of mistakes and it was trial by fire. And so I just want to, you know, I want to express appreciation to you for saying, look, things do get easier once you've got cash flow. But to say like 10, 12 years of getting there and the loneliness and the perhaps fear. These are all things that I can relate to as an entrepreneur and building my business. It's easy man. I didn't plan, I didn't know we were going to, but it's easy to compare your movie to somebody else's highlight reel. Yeah, it's a great way to describe it. Yeah, because you're not a right, you read the, the article and income magazine or entrepreneur magazine about how the, how the business is thriving or whatever, what you don't see is the lawsuits along the way and the, uh, the struggles with the family. I mean it was, I don't have kids, but it was really hard in my life. Um, to, to relocate. We bought, we had to move from our native Virginia to boston to buy the business originally and She had to leave a lot of friends and a career that was really working out well for. So there, there are a lot of sacrifices along the way and, and just to pile on a little bit more to that in 2018. I pretty much couldn't, I...

...couldn't do it anymore. One of the reasons that I wrote the book as I was ready to, to shift years, fortunately we had built a great team around the dealerships, but I actually, I'm talking to you today from Charlottesville Virginia. I'm a refugee from my own businesses because it was, it was more than I could handle. Um, it just, it just took its toll on me. So fortunately I saw it coming and put the pieces in place to, to make sure that we could keep the dealership in the family and to make sure that we didn't have to sell the businesses to companies that wouldn't take care of our people in the way we demand that they were taken care of, but, but it takes a lot out of you, that's for sure, yeah, entrepreneurship is not for the faint of heart. Uh, but you know, I just, I appreciate that and, and the vulnerability of it, which to me is a character trade. It's a characteristic of great leaders. The fact that you're even, you know, saying sitting in front of me now saying, yeah, I'm grateful that we're, I'm aware of where I'm at. But also this deep rooted stewardship I think is the word I will use for your people. Hey, we're not just going to give this, that we're going to keep this in the family to make sure that it just doesn't get pond off to somebody that's not going to take care of these people. I think just is so, so tremendous. I have thoroughly enjoyed this conversation. I'm so glad that we were able to connect. But I, I guess it's my last two questions um, where can those listening get a copy of your book and also how can they connect with you? It can do both at Jeff moral dot com. And I'll point out too that that if someone's not completely sold on buying the book yet, that's okay. There are a lot of resources that I alluded to earlier, that are available to business owners to operate their businesses in a pro social way. And that's, that's the whole point of the book. And the website is I wanted to have resources for the people who wanted to do the right thing. We wanted to improve their communities and earn a good living at the same time. Man, you can get more of the show notes and any links mentioned in this podcast episode by visiting triple W dot the dealer playbook dot com forward slash Jeff dash moral M o R R I L Jeff. Thanks so much for joining me on the dealer played with podcast. Thank you Michael, I'm Michel Cirillo. And you've been listening to the dealer Playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, please click the subscribe button wherever you're listening right now. Leave a rating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make big changes in your life and career and want to connect with positive, nurturing automotive professionals, join my exclusive DPB Pro community on facebook. That's where we share information, ideas and content that isn't shared anywhere else. I can't...

...wait to meet you there. Thanks for listening. Yeah.

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