The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 4 months ago

Key Components That Will Enhance The Car Shopping Experience w/ Carla Wade

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Dealership BDC reps play a key role in bridging the gap between the online car shopping experience and the in-store experience. Rather than working in a silo as a separate department, the BDC should be an extension of the showroom floor. Doing so will allow reps to have greater empathy for the customer's journey, and how they can fulfill the customer's needs when they come for a test drive, fill out paperwork, and work with the business office.

Yeah. The spirit of enhancing a customer'sexperience. What are some of the key components you would submit are crucialto? I guess the day to day activities of the BBC. Yeah, sure. So I think putting yourselfin the consumers seat, right? So how do you like to be taken care of if yousubmit an email to a business or an organization, how quickly would youlike your response to come back? How knowledgeable would you like thatperson to be on the other end of the phone? Um you know, how convenient arethey making this transaction for you? And and these are some of the keycomponents where BDC can really help...

...make that difference. Yeah. You talkabout how the BBC essentially is a conduit to the showroom floor. Whatdoes that look like? You know, I'm thinking about the day to dayoperations of a dealership. How does the BDC and especially with all of thesilos, right. Sales rarely knows what marketing is doing. Marketing kind ofhas an overall agenda, but maybe F. And I. And and parts and service. They haveno clue about any of this stuff. How can the B. D. C. B. I guess thelinchpin or the the sun by which the solar system revolves? Yeah. So um soso often, you know, in a dealership it's difficult to kind of create thosesynergies, right? And instead of looking as your BBC as a separatecenter or a separate department, make sure that they have the right productknowledge and understand some of the ancillary positions of your over salesrep. Right? So for example, you know your product very well, you know whatinventory you have in stock, right? Um...

You can guide the customer throughpotentially the difference between one model versus the next. You have someindustry intel. Um So this way they can almost give the customer the verybasics of what they need um to help complete the shopping create arelationship with sales rep and BBC. That is a hand in glove typerelationship. There's no competition here, Right? Um, the BBC should behappy to hand off their customers to a sales rep and a sales rep. Feelconfident that this customer is ready and prepped and armed for what theyneed to make that purchasing decision. Mm I love that. You know, any time webring up anything to do with culture and a healthy workplace culture, I justperk up. I think, you know, especially on the DPB for those listening, it'simportant that you understand in seven plus years now of producing the show,Over 75% of all guests on the show...

...speak to the importance of a healthyculture. We can't ignore this. How do you, in your experience from yourobservations? How do you create this hand in glove, as you say, experiencein something that has traditionally been viewed as a shark tank. How do wereally create that relationship? Yeah. So it's it's get them involved anddon't exclude them. So you're having your sales meeting, you're having thatmonday morning jump start your having that saturday morning meeting beforethe big weekend sale. Um get your BDC in that meeting with you so that theyunderstand what's happening at your showroom. They feel an integral memberand part of your organization and create those synergies that knowledgeis power and making them feel involved. Makes reps um a lot more passionateabout what they're doing and why they're doing it.

This this idea back, I think one of myfirst jobs as uh just in the workforce was at best buy Now in Canada used tobe called Future Shop and it was very shark tank. E however, every singlemorning, I remember we had a meeting where they would walk througheverything that was going on and those of us who were paying attentionexcelled. This was commissioned sales. So back in the day, it was allcommission sales. Um it wasn't, you know, no pressure this and that it waslike you are buying a tv today pal. Yeah, But you also made really good. Iremember I was 17 year old, I was the youngest commission salesperson inCanada. They traditionally didn't hire 17 year olds to do commission sales. Umwhen I was like, sorry pal, I I am not slinging cds, I don't work in the likeI'm making money and but those of us...

...that paid attention in those meetings,understanding that they were there to make sure everyone was in the loop, weexcelled those that were like, man, whatever. They just sat there in thecorner waiting for customers to come from them. They come to them, they hadno clue. You know, what was going on and how we were able to stack deals andhow we were able to stack products and incentives and and all of those sortsof things. And I see this is very much the case, you know, in dealership worldwhere there's just such a lack of communication. Do you outside of thatmorning meeting? Are there any other communication methods that you foundwork really well and just keeping the team connected? Yeah. So that's therelationship between, you know, the BDC and your showroom floor, Right? Yoursales reps. Now in my, my older organization, what we had was we had afew reps that were dedicated to either the internet sales and I'm putting upquotation marks here, Right? Internet...

...sales and that and that type of thing.And that was those sales reps that really kind of understood thedifference between this type of customer versus, you know, the personwho walks right in through your showroom door. They understand that,that customers potentially already been online and shopping you against manyothers, right? Kind of arming themselves with information. Have a tonof questions that some may may throw you a curveball. So we had dedicatedreps that were ready to receive a message from the BBC that the customerwas coming in um or that they had someone on the phone that was ready totake the sale a little bit further and they worked really well in concert withthat particular BBC rep helping smooth that transaction for the customer,which seems almost seamless as if they were talking to the same person or long.And so are they actually going through the some sort of a handoff? And what Imean by that is I think most consumers,...

...when when somebody picks up the phone,they automatically just assume they're talking to a sales rep. Right? So, sois this actually saying like, hey, my name is Michael and I work in our, youknow, concierge department to make sure that you have all the infant. Like howdoes that look? Are they making it known that they're in a differentdepartment than sales? Mhm. Yeah. So I used to go as far as having my BBC repsgreet their inbound customers on the showroom floor and make that intro tothe sales rep that used to go over so incredibly well because sometimes umcustomers shop online for so long that they've created a relationship with myBBC rep, right? They've become someone that they, they kind of trust and lookto for information. So having that personal hand off when it's possible,right allows that person to feel like...

...they're entrusting me in Michael'shands. I must be in good hands and you've already transferred a lot ofthat information that you've gotten from your customer to the sales rat. Sotherefore the customer doesn't feel like they're starting from ground zeroall over again with the transaction. Mm I love that. In this, um, age ofdigital retail, the impending doom of closing dealerships all over the worldand move the room model or the carbon. What can dealerships in your opinion,be doing today to fortify perhaps against something like that and or getwith the program. Yeah. Well, thank goodness that cars are still sexyenough, that people do still want to see them in person or potentially givethem a little bit of a test drive. But you're right. There is this um, onecomponent that we cannot avoid, right? And that is the covid kind of reallyopened the doors to this, right, where...

...we were kind of forced to go thedigital route where leaning on, you know, uh, data and analytics andcreating platforms or being flexible with our model to allow customers tofeel safe and have options when it comes to their, their buying, um, needsby opening up digital retailing. So I can tell you that like, you know, 80%of dealers currently have adapted to some kind of creative delivery methodout of, out of the pandemic and that's not going to go away. Right? So ofpeople that we've actually um surveyed as well, about 65% of people said thatthey purchase their vehicles completely online, digital retailing and all. Andthey'd like to do so again. So even though we may go back to a sense ofnormalcy very soon, um, this new digital retailing age may be somethingthat will stick around for some time.

Car Vanna and those folks are creatinga convenience and that's what customers are looking for. Something that meetstheir needs. I can come in store and Shopify like I can have the cardelivered to me and while I shop online if I like. So being flexible is reallygoing to allow you to stay ahead of the game and make sure that you'redelivering again, going back to those experiences that your consumers lookingfor. I'm Michel Cirillo and you've beenlistening to the dealer Playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, pleaseclick the subscribe button wherever you're listening right now, leave arating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make bigchanges in your life and career and want to connect with positive,nurturing automotive professionals, join my exclusive DPB Pro community onfacebook. That's where we share...

...information, ideas and content thatisn't shared anywhere else. I can't wait to meet you there. Thanks forlistening.

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