The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 1 year ago

Melanie Borden: How To Get Better Engagement On Social Media

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Melanie Borden, VP of marketing at Celebrity Motor Cars, shares her wisdom about getting better engagement on social media and growing your profiles in simple ways. Her social activity and rapid growth have helped her get the attention of multiple media outlets as a feature in articles both inside and outside the retail automotive vertical. 

Get the Social Media Cheat Sheet and discover how you can take your social media engagement to a whole new level: www.thedealerplaybook.com/melanie-borden 

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Hey, gang, you know what's on my mind? More than deleting all the annoying kids shows that show up in my YouTube watch. History from over quarantine. Better marketing decisions. Yep, that's right. That's why I'm so excited to be supported by my friends at pure cars who put the power of data and superior information into the hands of dealers where it belongs. Use peer car to make a better marketing decisions and get better results. Visit Pierre cars dot com to get a free no risk, no obligation digital strategy analysis today that's Pierre cars dot com Get the resources and a social media cheat sheet mentioned in this episode by visiting the dealer playbook dot com forward slash Melanie Dash board in Hey, welcome to this episode of the Dealer Playbook, a podcast that explores what it takes to create a thriving career in the retail auto industry. I'm your host, Michael Cirillo, so excited to be talking about social media how you can tell better stories than May I call her the maven Melanie boarding you really? Are that the maven? I would say of social media these days. Now for all of you DP beers who know that you need to be leveraging social media who see others doing it really well. But maybe you just can't seem to crack the code. I get it. I'm actually with you. In fact, it wasn't until recently, and by recently I mean, like, I've produced the show now for seven years and and so recently I finally felt like I had the bandwidth to make a more committed effort. Social media. I've experienced the struggle of not knowing what to say, overthinking it. Analysis, paralysis. And, you know, certainly I've gone through the motions in the past of getting discouraged when, after putting what I felt like was my heart and soul into a post, it got, like, two likes or you know, something like that. And so that's why I'm so happy to introduce you The Dpb gang to Melanie board. And she's the VP of marketing at celebrity motor cars. So she's in the She's in the trenches day in and day out. She's garnered a large following by doing exactly what we're gonna be talking about today. Melody, thank you so much for joining me on the dealer playbook. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to finally sit down and talk to you. Yes. I mean, look, there have been some weird circumstances over the last year. I am delighted that you're on the show. Uh, I am delighted that despite you having to do all the things, um, you know, I see you as a really strong testament to being able to be disciplined, to be present at work, to be present as a mama, to be present in like you're on. You've got media exposure. You have. You're growing your social media following like crazy. You're doing all the things. And so I just think I'm a believer that we need to celebrate the winds, no matter how big or small. So the fact that you're navigating home schooling like, you know, the virtual school and all that crap that just like I don't know how you do it. I never want to hear the word virtual school ever, ever again. I think it was maybe three or four weeks into virtual schooling, and they were doing this weird hybrid where my wife had to be. They're walking them through stuff, but then they would have segments online and the school teacher would show up and it must have been two or three weeks into it. And my oldest son, Dallin, he's 11. He said, Mom, I love you, but you're not a good teacher. My heart kind of broke a little bit because I'm like, Well, she didn't ask for this. She didn't go. No,...

...no, no, we did not know. No one didn't. I mean, and I highly respect the people that did go to school and that love Children so much. But I mean, it's almost like the double edge store because you fight. I mean, for someone like myself who's in the dealership or so to say who was in the dealership 5 to 6 days a week, going from that to then being with my Children all the time. It was blessing. But at the same time, I'm not a teacher. I never had any desire to be a teacher and the virtual school and navigating Google classroom and see saw and all the different applications that these kids are using. It's a learning curve in itself, and none of us signed up for that. When we all became parents. No one ever said, By the way, in a few years you're going to go through this massive challenge in your life, and you're gonna be working full time your kitchen table with your kindergartner, and she's going to be doing class on her computer. By the way, I loved I loved your post from the other day on LinkedIn. You just see these two little hands hanging over your shoulders and you're cracking up. Oh my gosh, I just love that so much because it's also a testament to a You've built a narrative on your social platforms where, you know, I think, and I've certainly gone through this. That's why I kind of opened the conversation this way. Is we? We feel like we have to be so, you know, professional. And you know we can't be vulnerable and we can't be in the moment. And we can't be sporadic. But you've you've really hit this. What's the word like critical mass where you're starting to grow so quickly? I think when I started following you on LinkedIn, like what, 23 months ago, Um, you had 20,000 followers, which is amazing today. It's like up past 35,000 like it's growing fast and you're still finding the time to, like be like, No, I'm in the moment and I've and I've been able to build this narrative, which is something I really want to dig into with you today that you're comfortable posting a picture with these tiny little hands hanging over your shoulder and cracking up and knowing that that ultimately fits into this. Overall, Who is Melanie and and like, you've just embraced that, and I think that's so phenomenal. So I want to ask you, I guess my first question is, and especially as we tie it into dealerships and how they're navigating social media, we do know that there is an element of pay to play, which I think every dealership on the planet is doing now. But you've also like, to my point, you've also achieved kind of this critical mass where this snowball is rolling down the mountain organically. What are some of the common challenges, like putting our dealer hats on for a minute? What are some of the common challenges you see or that you've experienced that dealers are still doing that? Maybe they should shift their focus around. That's a good question, and it's one that I think every single dealership. For the most part, there's probably like the one person that hasn't figured out. But most of them don't understand social media to begin with, and I think that's the number one challenge is that they don't understand it. And Number two, something that I've been made aware of, is that a lot of dealerships across the country do not see their employees as building their own voices as a positive. They look at that as a way for their employees to find other employment, when in fact it's elevating their brand of their dealership versus, you know, having a fear mindset where they are allowing that person to go and...

...grow and develop a following that it will have some sort of negative impact on the store, which it won't. Do you think that I mean, it's obviously a limiting belief, and it's also, I think, a natural belief of someone like say okay, so I'm the leader of my business. If I wasn't embracing social and personal brand and seeing how that's elevated me, I would be very hesitant for my team to do it. Perhaps me like projecting my fear on them. But because I'm not that way, I want my team to be present on social and to be building a brand. So do you think that's a limiting belief on leadership? Because they traditionally are not out there doing that level of personal branding? It is, but they just have to frame it to something that's modernized. So they're pushing their sales associates to be on the phones, to be responding to email and to be, you know, doing as much you know, networking with customers that have been considered to be ups, for example, right and social is just the modernized version of that. It's just a modernized version of being able to connect with customers. But having them buy into you, I always use. And if anyone, they might roll their eyes listening to my example. But I like to use Tesla as an example, because Tesla everyone knows who Tesla is. But everyone also knows who Elon Musk is, and Elon Musk is not the sole owner of Tesla. There are other owners of Tesla. There are people behind Elon Musk, but everybody knows Elon Musk, and they know they follow him. And because some people are so bought into him, they're also buying the vehicles. So and I'm not just saying like a leader in terms of a title like a CEO or VP or other sea level should be the one that's out there. But I do believe that everyone should be out there creating a name for themselves and networking. It's the old school networking, you know. There are sales people that I know of, not just that work at dealerships. But working in the auto industry is like a supplier or vendor. Or maybe they work in sales and pre covid. They were in networking groups where they would meet every Thursday morning. Uh, you know, every second Thursday morning at 7 a.m. And they would network with other professionals. That's what social media really is. It's just people don't understand it. That's my perception anyway. All right, Before we get any further into this conversation, I want to tell you about an incredible resource to supercharge your sales volume. Now, as many of you know, unless you've been living under a rock, there are lots of marketing companies and services out there who claim to be able to deliver buyers to your online or actual showroom. But I've seen Pierre cars up close and I gotta tell you, I was super impressed. It's the real deal. They connect the dots between your marketing and operations. Pure cars tools are powerful. And simply put, they work whether your goal is to grow market share versus your competitors, turn your inventory faster, increase roos or expand your reach. Go to pier cars dot com to get your free digital strategy analysis and unlock your dealerships. True profitability potential again. That's pure cars dot com, and I think that's really valuable. Do you think that because you see it that way? I know I That was a That was a switch that had to flip in my brain because I went through phases of I don't know what to say. So then be I don't know what to say turns into doing what everyone else does. So glad that I got to speak at the blah, blah, blah, and it's like very like weird promotional Lee. But it's also written, and you notice this. Everybody writes sentences as if they were bullet points like just finished at this event so great to be part of it. It's like what's happening here and we revert to...

...that. And that's the kind of dare I say crap that doesn't get anybody engaged. It doesn't build the network. So do you think that that this understanding is what has allowed you? Because by the way, when I see your LinkedIn posts And by the way, if you're not following Melanie on LinkedIn, you need to do it right now. Pull over. Open the length in app. Wait, What you talking about? You don't have the LinkedIn app. Download the LinkedIn app for crying out loud and follow. Because, Hugh Melody, I know you've been an example to me whether I verbalized it or not, because you've found this this way of just you're not on social media being like. And by the way, celebrity motorcars is the number one blah, blah, blah in the tri state area. Like what? Everybody got your You're not and you use Ellen as an example. But I see that as a as a tremendous example. Why? Because Ellen can go onto Twitter and type in the word dodge and people go and blow up a Cryptocurrency that has absolutely zero monetary value, like that's the power of that guy's brand. I know I love him. He's got a serious following hardcore Ellen enthusiasts, and I'm one of them. But that's That's a testament, though, because then we get to know him. He doesn't have to say the Tesla model s with long range performance is my preferred. He doesn't. He just He doesn't have to. So is that the code that you found needs to be cracked here like you can get people to know you, right? So la, uh, last, uh, in December of 2019, I was just thinking about different ways that I would be able to bring more value to the company. And I thought, Well, I'm seeing all these people on social media who sell cars now. Although I'm in marketing. But I do sell cars because if I work for a dealership and I'm even though I'm not customer facing, I still, um, representing the company I work for. So although I'm technically not on the sales floor, I do sell myself and the company when I show up anywhere. And I opened my mouth and I say anything because I'm representing the business. So I'm seeing these people who are on social media that are active and they have followings. And I'm hearing the things that they're saying that they're doing. And I thought, Well, what if all the sales people in all the stores where I work can start doing the same thing? What if they're all building their brands and people are networking with them and they are creating their own voice and they are developing their own followings, and they're basically leveraging their name and celebrities name, therefore bringing in more money for themselves and more money for the stores? And that was my thought process when I started this, and then I had never really done personal branding before to the level that I now have the knowledge just from doing it myself. But what I started seeing is I wasn't getting as much by in as I wanted, and I said, Okay, I'm just gonna do this. So I created a Brandon guide and all these different social media workshops for all the sales people at the dealerships and there at the time, there was probably like 70 plus people in those departments, and there were some people that were really excited about it and really started working with me that still do one on one training with me. But we're doing it, you know, over Zoom right now. And so are over the phone. We go through and we talk about things. But what I realized is in order to have, it's very difficult, As you know, to just start posting on social media. It's so hard,...

...and the one thing that you really have to do is you need to have a plan, and you need to have a goal in mind before you do anything, just like with the marketing campaign. So, for example, when I when I talked to one of my vendors on digital advertising, I'll just use that as an example, Um paid search. We're talking about the dealerships. PM A. We're talking about who our competitors are. We're having conversations that are strategic about the dealership goals. It's the same exact thing if you frame it with a person about themselves the same day. So that's how I made the connection. And I think for owners who don't understand social or GMs who can't figure out how to do it. That's how they're having these conversations every day, or at least every month with their vendor partners about marketing and advertising. So they're they're used to it. They just have to think about it in terms of themselves and then start that way and then determine what do I want from this? Do I want to sell more cars? Do I want to go to another dealer group? What do I What is my goal of doing this on social? Not that once you have those goals and you know what you want from it, then you can really create your voice and you can then solve problems for people. And that's where the value comes in. Yeah, I think this is tremendous. Two things that I'm taking away from this, um, you brought in by in and I love that you brought that up because I think that's a very real struggle. We have this generational mix in dealerships right now. There's some of the old dogs, like I don't I don't have a better word for them. We love them. It's very true. It's a comment that I get often and I get direct messages, not just from the car business from other businesses. And this morning, actually, someone I'm not sure what industry he worked in, but he was asking how to make his sales people. I don't know if that was the exact words that he used, but that's what I took away. How do you make them use social media? And my answer to that is you need to educate them and you need to lead by example. Those are the two things you have to do. You have to have them understand what it is and how it works and how it's going to benefit them. Because at the end of the day, sales people don't want to do anything unless it's going to make the money. I think that's tremendous, too, and you're speaking to having a plan. I mean, that's been a great North star for me. As I've started to become more consistent on social media, when I sit down and I'm vibing on a thought or or not even just social media like this podcast, I'll read it to everybody. I have an intention statement. What is my intention? So the Melanie Borden podcast is to help dealers leverage social media beyond the norm to get creative and tell stories and how to craft a better story in a few simple stuff, like we have an intention to that the conversation. We have an intention on posting. But what do you think like you mentioned? Sell more cars? What would I be? Okay and and and you tell me I love your thoughts on this. I feel like my intention on social should not be to sell more cars. That should be to build more relationships, right? Well, the sell more cars comes from the relationship part. So and that's the thing. When you're going and you're starting your own social presence and you work at a dealership and you're in sales or let's say, for example, you're in service. Whether it's a sales executive or service consultant, you want to know where your audience is, like, where are your customers? Who are your customers who are buying your cars? And so when you understand who your customers are? And most people that work at dealerships do understand who's buying their cars, they go through a lot of factory training. They're interacting with customers. If they sold cars for a...

...year or for 20 years. They know who their customers are. So once you have an understanding of who your customers are and how they shop, right. So, for example, I was having a conversation with the G M this morning of another dealership outside my group. Just he just called to say hi, and he works for a domestic brand. And I do believe that some of the domestic brands that are not luxury have a different type of shopper than, let's say, for example, some of our shoppers that come into our stores because we're super high line and and knowing the differences and how they shop and where they're shopping and what they're looking at and having that education. Because a lot of times dealerships and you could probably agree with this to they're not even educating their sales teams on what marketing they're doing and where their marketing and what kind of marketing. And if they're doing traditional advertising and they're not asking their customers, where did you find us so educating your sales teams on marketing? In my opinion, if you want your store to have a team of people that's successful with social. You want them to have a full understanding of what marketing is, and it will only help them. And it will only help the business and increase gross profit by doing so. This is so amazing. Now, you mentioned to have a plan, and you also mentioned lead by example. So I'm curious because I don't think a day has gone by that I haven't seen a post from Melanie. What is your process for maintaining consistency when it comes to social? And and does that even matter like doesn't matter if I'm there every single day. I do think it matters to to show up every day. I do think it matters to be consistent, and I think that every platform is different with how you interact with it. And the platform has its own algorithm, depending on which one you're on. But all of them interact with engagement. And so if you are engaging in the comments, if you have people who are liking your posts, who are viewing your posts, who are saving your posts? Commenting The engagement is really important in terms of your posts when they're out there. But what I have found. And I started with just LinkedIn and now I've kind of branched out to other social platforms. Now that I feel more comfortable and more confident in myself and my abilities to post, um, I have found with Lincoln, and this is and you probably already know this. But this is like my insider tip. When you post at the same time every day the algorithm favors you. I know that it's true and there are analytics that you can download and that you can look at to prove it. But that has been something that I have found that has helped me with the engagement on my posts. Are you scheduling those that, like you use the software? You like setting an alarm and you're like, All right, here we go on my phone alarm on my phone, and I post it. Yeah, and there are for me. There are a couple different times. I mean, some people say you should post, you know, 12 times a day. Some people say you have to post six times a day. I try for one or two, but I also usually take one day off a week from posting but that's just my personal preference. But because you've shown up every single day at the exact same time, your audience knows when to expect you. Right? Um, I did not know that, by the way. And I wrote that very quickly. Yeah, with the star. Um, so...

...let me just make sure I got that when you post at the same time every day the algorithm favors you, but in addition to your audience also favors you because they know when to show up. Yeah, I'd like someone to prove me wrong on that, but that is my personal take away from. But first of all, how could they prove you wrong? Because within 20 minutes of you posting, you've got 400 likes and 30 you know, 3000 views. And, like, I think you've cracked the code. Yeah. Don't smell LinkedIn, though, that I know Well, you know, but this is interesting, because in full transparency, like at the top of the show, I brought up like my own social media journey. A lot of people over the years, like I've picked up a lot of flak. People are like, How do you have the top podcast with all these streams and all these listeners, and you become a keynote, this and that, and then nobody's following you on Social. And the simple answer is because I wasn't focusing on it. I was building a business, right? Um, yeah, there's that phrase. It's, uh, what is it? It's Oh, my God, I just lost it. Energy When energy flows, where thoughts go, thoughts go where energy flows. Something like that. The same. That's that's what I think when when I hear that now, having said that, speaking to your point about consistency every single Thursday for the last seven years a new episode of this podcast has come out. And let's call the my social platforms the last seven years speaking to your point about consistency, have favored that consistency. Those those are my social platforms now, but to the point of LinkedIn, because I think this is an underrated and should not be an underrated platform. It is, in fact, my platform of choice. Um, so I mentioned that I finally felt like I had the bandwidth. My team has grown, the business is growing. I'm in that, like sweet spot where I can focus on scale. Not like, uh, like, hands on, like, rolling up my sleeves and type and, you know, and doing all that kind of stuff, which is so fun. But in December, just to give context to what Melanie's saying here in December of 2020 I decided I am going to go all in on LinkedIn and full transparency. I only I think I might have had 3500 connections or followers. That was November 29th or November 28th is when I made the decision. I'm like, I'm going to go all in on LinkedIn, and I'm gonna post every day. I'm gonna engage in the comments. Like the way Melanie just said, By the end of December, I had over 160,000 views on my content. It blew me away. Melanie. It's continued to blow shield analytics. I am using shield. Yeah. Yeah, that was at the maybe my third weekend. I saw a post about shield, and I'm like, metrics for the marketer. Yeah, so that's been tremendous. But also to your point, like you said, engaging in the comments, it is crazy to me back to your point about this is the modern way of connecting with people and how many people post. And then people are commenting. But the author of The Post doesn't get back in there and engage with those comments. Absolutely. And I started with LinkedIn because I just looked at some of the facts about the platform. I mean, you have every C level executive globally on LinkedIn and from a sales perspective, anyone who I mean for the realm that I live in, which is high lined vehicles. The customers who are buying $100,000 car. They're on LinkedIn They are. They might not be as active as you and I are within that 1% of the people who are posting, But...

...they're on LinkedIn. So why wouldn't a sales executive at a dealership be creating an audience for themselves? We're talking about the vehicles and talking about themselves and talking about the ways that they bring value to the whole customer experience. Right? You mentioned. So now we know you started on LinkedIn. We know that it's my platform of choice. Clubhouse has forced me to be a little more active on instagram. Uh, you know, But do you do you think that that feeds into consistency for for the individual, that's like, Oh, man, But there's Facebook. Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest. Like all these things, I feel the pressure to be on. Do you? I think that that creates a fatigue, perhaps that causes them to not be consistent. Yeah, I mean it. Could you have to? I mean, it's good to have consistency everywhere, just like with your marketing messaging. You want to have the same message on your website as you do in your advertising, as you do in your paid advertising on social as you do in whatever campaign that you're running and invent. It's the same thing. You want to generally have the same look and feel, whether it's on LinkedIn, Twitter clubhouse Instagram look if you use it and so the pressure to be on all of those because I know you pick linked in. But what do you say to the person like you say? Pick your spots? Or do you say no? You got to be everywhere. I really wasn't active on social media in January of 2020 at all, so I mean, I wasn't on Instagram. I was on Facebook but I use Facebook more for like my family pictures of my kids, my friends from high school, et cetera. That's really Facebook for me, So I tend to keep that more private. But with the other platforms, I wasn't as comfortable, and I personally did not like Instagram and I fought being on it. I just felt from a perspective of trying to be taken seriously in the business world, There's a lot of misinformation from people who represent themselves as being something that they're not. And I feel like that's very prevalent on Instagram, and this is just like a personal quirk of mine. But I'm on it now. I'm on it now. I see you there. US newbies to instagram. Um, you mentioned something, so I just wanna before I I transitioned into picking your brain on storytelling and how you do that in your process. For that, you did. You know, I kind of want to circle back a little bit. Um, you mentioned that this is the modern day way of connecting with people like there are still the antiquated and I don't want to say it antiquated. I don't want to suggest that they don't work. But there are still people just pounding the phone day in and day out. And they're not devoting any time to social media now in in your organization or in your mindset, I guess. Flipping that on its head, I know people are going to wonder. Well, how much time, then, per day should I be committing to social media activities? And what should those activities look like, Right. That's a great question. And it's something that I get asked a lot in terms of how much time do you spend? And it's really as much time as you want to spend on it. So for someone who's in sales, who's just starting out? So, for example, there's a woman at one of the dealerships in the group that I work for, and she is one of the top salespeople. She's a single mom. She takes social media very seriously. She has her own tripod with a light. She brings that around with her at the store, in between test drives or in between, you know, working at her desk. She's using that. She joined a mom...

...group on Facebook in her town that she lives in which is right next to the dealership, and she's active on that group, not even trying to be Sales E. But she created her own Facebook page for herself for her business because she looks at it as if she has her own business. And she has generated a bunch of sales just from the mom group. And she's developed relationships with the PTO that her son school she's developed relationships at baby stores. She joined the Chamber of Commerce in her town. So there are things. It's what you make of it. It's how driven are you? How motivated are you? Are you going to take it seriously? Do you want to take photos? Do you take delivery photos? Are you taking video of yourself doing walk arounds of the vehicle? Are you sending your customers videos when they're sending in a lead on a particular car? So there's so many things that you could be doing in. You could spend anywhere from five minutes to five hours, creating content. You obviously will get better at it as you do it more, but it's really, you know, spending an extra 15 to 20 minutes a day just working on creating some posts, I think, would be a really great initiative for anyone at a dealership to do. I'm so inspired by stories like that of individuals who are doing it. And the big takeaway for me is that it sounds like she stopped thinking like a salesperson so that she could just be a good part of the community, right? Exactly. Exactly. And she worked in restaurants for the majority of her career. So she already has this hospitality mindset, and she understands the value of community and the whole customer experienced. And her reviews are amazing. And, by the way, with mentioning reviews, you can take pieces of reviews and use that for content that takes, like, literally 30 seconds to do. There's your post. So outside the box, thinking I love it, Um, it is It's so inspiring because I think you know, too many people are defining themselves by what they do for a living. You just showed an example. I mean, we can look to you as an example. Yes, you work quote unquote inside an organization, but you are the CEO of you, correct? Right? And so you conduct yourself as the CEO of you which which in my opinion, kind of opens you up to not think like a marketing director like a you know, like a VP of marketing. You think of, like, know, how do I expand my community? Because my community and you know, feeds into who I represent and, you know, and other operatives who knows who knows when we're gonna see a LinkedIn course by Melanie Borden on how to use length in like it feeds into so many facets of life? Exactly. And the thing is, is that a lot of people have a mindset of while I don't know if I can be posting about the things that I do at work, because that's proprietary information to the company that I work for. And I don't want anybody else to steal that information because that is our information and no one else can have it. But you can work in marketing like myself, and you can create a name for yourself and not mention one thing that you do in your daily job. In specifics as far as detail on Data Analytics, you know your day to day, et cetera. You can be very, very general and still build a following about yourself, which I have walked that line since January last year and you're doing amazing at it. And I love it. I mean, this podcast is a testament. We've done it for seven years. I've maybe mentioned the name of my agency five times over the years. Yet this has somehow driven our biggest...

...and longest lasting client relationships. Yeah, absolutely. It's so true. And the opportunities people say to me, Well, you know, I've been posting on social media and it's just not just not doing anything for me, and I said, Okay, that I hear that a lot. It just doesn't do anything. It doesn't. It's not going to do anything. Well, you have to be consistent number one, and you got to keep it going. You can't just stop because you didn't sell a car. You got to keep it going. It's about networking. It's about like you've mentioned building relationships, and the opportunities come they do. This is a perfect example of an opportunity for myself on social media, right, because I never would have met you without links in, and you wouldn't have asked me to come on to your podcast without LinkedIn. You wanna Never. But you would have been like, Wait, who is this bald bearded Seth Rogen look like? What is this? Um okay, I want to transition because I really like I love this conversation. Melanie, um, let's talk about storytelling because you are so good at it. And we hear people like this is the the great challenge of, you know, non sequential learning a little bit like it's always a challenge we have on the podcast is this is one nugget in a sea of everything, and obviously, we need to apply anything. We learn anywhere to the context of our circumstances. However, where I'm going with this, as so many people say, Well, you just got to tell better stories and they never, like, break that apart for it. Like I just think of the poor people I know. I've been there. They're going. What makes a good story or or the best clubhouse nugget is you've just got to give more value. I don't know what my sister, how is your wife? So all of that to to ask you How do you How do you actually tell better stories? Like what are some simple things you've learned in your journey that help you tell better stories, right? So it definitely the first place I would start as it ties into number one, your goals and what your intentions are with using social media. So I'll give myself as an example. When I set out to do this, I wanted to create a name for myself in the auto industry, not just here on the East Coast, but all over the country. I've always worked in the auto. I mean, since 2000 and nine have been working in the car business, and I know a lot of people in the New York, New Jersey Connecticut tri state area, but I don't know as many people in the Midwest. I don't know many people in the South or on the West Coast, so my number one goal and objective with social is to create a name for myself so people know who Melanie is. And so with that being said to get there and to start with, the story is, and this ties into something that I executed for myself was trying to figure out what I do that's different. How do I differentiate myself. So some of the things that I would ask myself is, What benefit do I provide to other people? Um, what are my values? Who am I? I mean, it's kind of like a a journey into your soul when you start doing this because you're really trying to figure out who you are as a person, and how do you want other people to feel when they're reading your content? I mean, that's something that I think is so important with storytelling is how do you want other people to feel when they're reading Your posts are watching your videos. And if someone's in sales knowing who your audience is, like, who is buying your cars? Who are those people? Like we mentioned earlier? Those people who are buying your cars are the people that you need to understand as well. Do you think imposter syndrome finds its way into this mix because, you know, as I'm taking notes and you're writing down like, who am I? And what are my values?...

Um, and taking this journey into your soul, I think maybe some people I know I've struggled with it in the past. They go No, not me that you know. Now I feel like I'm faking it, or I feel like I'm How do you How would you recommend overcoming something like imposter syndrome as you take that journey into your soul? Uh huh. I think that I try to stay at the surface to an extent. And I know I said that you take a journey into your soul and I do believe that's true because you need to know who you are when you're posting and what messages that you want to put out there but in the way of imposter syndrome. I mean, the only way that you're really imposter is if you're doing something or saying something, that's not true. So I mean, for me, stick to your truth and the things that you know. And I like LinkedIn to keep it on the professional level. But to offer pieces of yourself that are also personal, if that makes sense, Yeah, I love that. And so concise. Stick to your truth. One of the things I love about doing this podcast and not having a set list of questions is that I get to meet like you can't fake this kind of stuff people would know real quickly if Melanie was a fraud or if I was a front. But how quickly you pulled out a concise stick to your truth. Yeah, so many people trying to embellish, right? We people try to embellish everything on social media, and then they just crash and burn because you can find out anything these days, right? Absolutely. You can. You can google anything, and you can really find out anything but getting back to some of your questions with storytelling. I mean having some of the answers about you know, your competitors, who are your competitors knowing who they are, who are the sales people? If I work at a Mercedes dealership, who's the next Mercedes dealership and you know right outside my AI that works there and what is their story? And who are they and what's their past and knowing who your competitors are? Um, and what are some companies that you really are people from? My In my case, I was looking at LinkedIn, and I would watch different women that I aspire to have a similar overall. Um, I don't want to say aesthetic experience, but somewhere along those lines in terms of I was watching what they were doing, and I would aspire to be like them. That makes sense. So who are those people or companies that you love and that you are a big fan of? And what about what they do? Do you like I love that? Be inspired? I think too often, especially in the in the the heat of the industry, where everyone sees each other as a competitor. One of the things that's been so valuable to me is I don't see that I have competitors. I don't have competition. I have coop it Ishan right exactly like I can get inspired. Someone made a comment about that the other day. They're like, Who's your competition? I'm like, I don't even know how to answer that. Like, I don't even know how to say that. Like, what do I look like? I'm not even thinking that way. I've been inspired by quote unquote competitors, but I've never felt like I need to mimic them. But you're speaking to taking inspiration from people who you look up to exactly. You know, I think that's so, so powerful, I think no, what makes you unique is really important. Everybody is unique, you know, just like I tell my kids, like everything about you is individual. Everything about you is special. It's the same way for adults to there's something about you that makes you different from everyone else and why someone would connect with you. So, yes, you want to talk about what you're doing, But you also want to interweave in some ways that make you...

...who you are. I want everybody. When this airs, I want you to go two triple W dot the dealer playbook dot com forward slash Melanie Dash Borden Because I want you to download what I call the bad to the bone worksheet. Because all of us, every single one of us to what Melanie is saying here are bad to the bone. We've all done incredible things. It's time for you to step into your greatness so that you can tell your story and celebrate your wins to. It's not going to come off as obnoxious or to be arrogant. I think that if you celebrate your wins and the things that you are proud of from a sales perspective, I believe that it's gonna attract more customers. Uh, you're amazing. Um, seriously, you know, I just love it because I love that you're you're you're doing it. We're seeing it happen in front of us. We we see how quickly this can happen for people who embrace what makes them unique. Um, so I want to ask you this enclosing we've We've talked about mindset. We've talked about, um, building relationships. We've talked about getting buy in from team, leading by example. We've talked about the importance of consistency, and you've just dropped us with a list of 20 things that are going to help tell better stories and really step into our greatness. Looking back over the last year, what are some mistakes that you would point out that we can avoid so that we can accelerate our growth on social media? Some mistakes that I made would be self promoting services that the company I work for cells and what I mean by that is there are ways to promote the business that you work for without having to say what you said earlier. You know, today we have the Labor Day special going on, and it's also the golden opportunity sales event and we have all these deals and it's ending, you know, tomorrow. So you have to come into the store. So I think posts like that that are, like, cheesy. I think it's a mistake to make. Um, I think that not doing video until November was another very big mistake that I made, um, video on LinkedIn and not just Lincoln, but also tiktok. I'm not really that active on TIKTOK. I created an account just to see what it was about. And now I'm just stuck watching Mom and dog videos. But I think video has an immense organic reach on both LinkedIn and tiktok, and there's huge opportunities on both platform for serious growth sidebar. You know, my wife and I called tiktok. We call it University. Oh, my God, I love it. I love to talk. I love the mom like wine videos. Those are like they did when the kids go to sleep videos with the wine. And I love those. And I didn't I actually didn't officially sign up for tiktok until about 3.5 weeks ago at time of airing this and because I only saw these highlight reels on Facebook watch. And it was like, Here's how I told my family that I don't like cats, and I'm like, tiktok stupid. Now I realize no, you want to learn how to organise your fridge? Yeah. It is going to turn into something amazing. It already is amazing, but it's going to turn into something massive in terms of advertising over the next couple of years. I believe it. Melanie Borden.

Thank you so much for joining me on the dealer playbook. Podcast. How can those listening yet in touch with you so you can always connect with me on LinkedIn? I actually, um I cannot accept any more connections, but you can follow me, and you can always send me a message. My profile is open. I also have my own website. If someone wants to contact me and it's Melanie borden dot com. You're so lucky you got your name. I was the only Michael Cirillo until the Internet happened. And then all these dudes named Michael cera was the fact that you got the domain. That's so strong. Okay, just toot your horn for just a minute. How come nobody can connect with you anymore on like this? Yes, I read the maximum amount of connections. You get one of these right here? Yes, that's what I'm saying. Melanie, thanks so much for joining me on the podcast. You're amazing. Thank you so much for having me. This is fun. Mhm. Mhm. Yeah. I'm Michel Cirillo. And you've been listening to the dealer playbook. Podcast. If you haven't yet, please click the subscribe button wherever you're listening. Right now, leave a rating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make big changes in your life and career and want to connect with positive, nurturing automotive professionals join my exclusive dpb pro community on Facebook. That's where we share information, ideas and content that isn't shared anywhere else. I can't wait to meet you there. Thanks for listening.

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