The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 5 months ago

Mike "C-Roc": How to Turn Setbacks Into Rocket Fuel

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How do you behave when things don't go your way? Maybe you didn't hit the number of vehicles sold that you were hoping, or you got passed up for the open management position at the dealership?

Mike "C-Roc" Ciorrocco is the CEO of People Building Inc., and the powerhouse behind the "What Are You Made Of?" movement. He joins the show to share his compelling story of setbacks and shares how you can turn your setbacks into rocket fuel. 

If you're ready to take control of your circumstances, this episode is a must-listen.

Noteworthy topics from this episode:

5:38 - What are the most common challenges that businesses face that prevent them from getting to the next level.

8:55 - How do you teach people to overcome the setbacks?

19:05 - Do you find the correlation between being easily stoppable and being unstoppable?

24:11 - How do you convey the importance of removing time from the equation and staying consistent?

27:53 - How to be more confident and remove fear?

31:04 - How not to worry about what other people think?

FlexDealer 

You've tried so many different things with your marketing but the dots never align. Your current agency sends you a fancy report but you have no clue what it means...

That's why more dealers are choosing to partner with FlexDealer. They're the creative marketing people behind some of the auto industry's most envied brands.

"Flex takes an approach unlike others I've ever experienced, and I can honestly say that I trust you guys. It's a strange and wonderful feeling! Being on a team with them and knowing they are in my corner jacks up my confidence and ups the fun factor of the car business. I'm so grateful! - Aaron Lange, Lange and Fetter Motors 

Find your best opportunities to grow with FlexDealer's free, immediate website audit. Visit www.flexdealer.com/website-audit


Hey, before we hop into this episode,let's talk about why your website and digital presence isn't working now. Iknow what you're thinking, Michael, we talk all about the web sites all thetime. You talk about the websites, the websites, a hammer, yada yada yada, weget it. But for real though, it's shocking to me how much guesswork stilltakes place and how its having a detrimental effect on whatopportunities you are able to leverage now over the last decade, especiallyfor the O. G. D. P. Beers. You know, I've poured my soul into assembling ateam that cares deeply about the progress of the retail auto industrythat believes in my mission to enrich and empower dealers to perpetually grownow. I'm making my amazing marketing team accessible to the dealer playbookcommunity so that you can start to thrive rather than merely survive.Right now, we're providing a just for you free website diagnostic that willshow you exactly what you need to do in a priority sequence so that you canfinally get the answers you need claim yours by visiting triple W dot flexdealer dot com forward slash website audit. That's triple W dot flex dealerdot com forward slash website dash audit. Hey gang, welcome to this episode ofthe dealer playbook, a podcast that explores what it takes to create athriving career right here in the retail auto industry. I'm your host,Michael Chiarello, joined by my pal mike. See Rock. We're talking about howto turn setbacks into rocket fuel. Here we go. Look, each of us experiencessetbacks, circumstances that we feel are beyond our control or ability toovercome in business and in life. None of us could have seen a global pandemiccoming. Many of us have suffered loss, pain, illness. Business owners havebeen forced to close or dramatically restructure how they operate. Perhapsyou lost your job and are looking for new employment or maybe you arestruggling with limiting beliefs that are holding you back from achievingyour definition of success. Whatever the case may be, you can turn setbacksinto rocket fuel. You can create a life that is bigger and bolder than youprobably can ever comprehend on this episode of the dealer playbook. I'mjoined by mike, See Rock my pal from clubhouse. He's featured by yahoo.Finance is one of the top business leaders to follow in 2020. He's theauthor of rocket fuel convert setbacks become unstoppable. My man Mike thanksso much for joining me on the dealer playbook podcast. Right back at youmike. I like to start every interview with gratitude. Uh, you know, it's abig part of my life but not just to be cliche, but I really want to um,genuinely thank you for allowing me to come on your show and share with youand your audience and thank you to the audience for listening. Yeah, it'samazing, man, and, and I've had the...

...opportunity to, to learn from you, weconnected on clubhouse. I am a ferocious note taker, everybody knowsthat about me now, so I've taken a lot of notes and it's, it's been cool tokind of get to know you a little bit through that app and where you're, uh,sentiments are and you're just your vibe and your values. So I, I justthink, you know, I'm I'm super excited about this first before we hop in, Ihave to say, I see this testimonial on your website, from the man GrantCardone, uh, and it cracks me up because it's soGrant, you know what I mean? It's so great. Like others have left reviewsabout your book and their thought out and they're, you know, they're they'rethey're all about what you can gain as a reader of the of your new book,Rocket Fuel. And then Grant Rocket Fuel is for you. It just cracks me upbecause I'm like, that couldn't be any more Grant if he tried and I justthought that was hilarious. Well, let me let me clarify that a little bitbecause that is taken out of the forward that he wrote. So he wrote aforeword for the book. Um and I, you know, pull it over here for a second.But for those of you, I don't know, I guess this is video as well watching,You can see he wrote the forward of the book and in there the forwards a couplepages long. So that's the last thing he wrote in the forward was at the bottombefore he signed his name, Rocket Fuel is for you. So we just took that partout just to give him a little bit of a credit that he's not just a man of fewwords because we know that he's not a man of few words, he can, he can pullout as many words. That's the one thing that fascinates me about the guys, youcould like wake him up from the deepest sleep and ask him, you know, like Grant,what do I gotta do to grow my business and be like, yeah, yeah, yeah, so, andthen he just like rips out like, uh, like, yeah, he just goes on, he justrips out this diatribe, but that's amazing. Uh and also, you know, supercool. This is almost like a full circle moment Grant spin on the show severaltimes. It's cool now to kind of meet more of the people in this ecosystem,you know, that are doing tremendous things that have taken control of life,living life on their terms to a whole new degree. And I mean somebody such asyourself that is now able to, you know, walk into a business or walk into uh a circumstance and pinpoint, here'swhere this thing needs to change, like here's where this thing needs to bedialed in. I think that's tremendous. So on the topic though, of using orleveraging setbacks as rocket fuel, I want to I want to basically start atthe beginning, what are some of the most common challenges or setbacks?Setbacks that businesses face that, that you've observed are holding themback from just like getting to that next level. All right. So yeah, in business ingeneral, let's start with sales. You know, sales people will have asituation where they don't close the deal, they get a deal closed and thenit falls apart. Um and they will let...

...that ruin their day. Maybe they're weakor maybe they're month and it's okay to fail. Like people justneed to understand this and this just goes across all avenues, whether it'srelationships, business sales, what have you, it's okay to fail. Butmastering failure is shortening the window from when you have that set backto when you get right back at it again. Looking for opportunities, get rightback up on the horse. As they say, right, That window shortening is themost powerful thing you can do because everybody's gonna experience setbacks.But most of the sales people that you run into, well, you know, they'll havethis this long length of time where they have this blow up period, theyaffect everyone around them in the business. And they also missopportunities to help people, you know, customers. And so that for me isteaching people right from the bat. I came from a sales background. You know,I've been in sales since 1998 and that was one thing for me that was powerfulis that when I didn't have something going my way, I didn't sit there andpout about it, I got like right back at it to try to recover as fast aspossible. And that allowed me to blow past my competition because most peopleand most companies will be stuck in that phase. And uh, you know,everything is ruined by that. So that's that in business, same thing inbusiness, a business owner, You know, look, when there's something thatdoesn't go right plea problems, uh, you know, losing money. business slows down.You know, it's really all stems back to taking 100% responsibility, which givesyou 100% control. People don't realize that the link between responsibilityand control. So you know, that's what I where I would start with that and Ilove what you're saying here because I think, you know, even as I've looked atmy own kind of entrepreneurial journey, um the length of time, I love whatyou're saying here about the length of time between the failure and the bounceback. I've noticed just in my own journey as I've sought to learn and toapply and improve myself, that that has shortened. And it really paid off bigin the crash of oh eight oh nine because that was when I first thoughtin my brain, okay, this certainly appears to be bad right now, but I knowit will work to my ultimate advantage. And I remember giving myself like 48hours to kind of sulk for a minute and then I was like, and then I got to comeout of this thing like freaking cheetah, you know? And but what I've alsoobserved to your point is, let's use business owners as theexample. They spend way too much energy and way too much time focusing on whatthe setback was. How could this happen? Right? Uh so so I love that you'rebringing up like this, this like trajectory almost like, hey, don't letthis thing screw you up, it happened, move past it. So what do you say to themindset piece of this? How can people, because it's got to be a muscle, right?Like you're, you're developing this...

...muscle, How do you get, how do youteach people to overcome the setback quickly? Well, first of all, ifsomebody is listening right now and they're in a diversity, the closerproximity you are to adversity, the harder it is to see light at the end ofthe tunnel, if there is any, the less hope you have. So it's very difficultto get this concept when you're in that, in that frame, uh, basically what youneed at that time is you just need to understand there's hope and as if itdoesn't kill you, you're gonna get through it. So just know that that, youknow, keep pushing and I have a saying thrust is a must you have to likethrust forward and fast. And that's something that reminds me always thatwe're going through that tough time or that just lets go, move, move, movemove. Um So first of all, when you're in that close proximity, get hope. Ifyou're trying to help someone, don't try to teach from the rocket fuel law,which I'll explain to you a second. Don't try to teach them that, just givethem some hope, get them moving. Now. If you're not in a university, thething, you need to understand it in life. The things that stop us fromaccomplishing thing and things and having the life of our dreams is notthe encouraging people. It's not the winds that we have and it's not, youknow, all the good stuff, it's all the bad toxic stuff, discouraging people.Setbacks, letdown screwups of our own. And if we just imagine if there was away to remove all that stuff and not just remove it cause I don't thinkthat's good enough actually taking it and store it in your fuel tank insteadof your trunk where it weighs you down and converted it into rocket fuel foryour future. If not just get you through to where you want to go. But itgets you there faster. And so Grant and I had a conversation on my podcastabout what would it take? He's always trying to make it, when will I make it?When will I make? And I look at that as get into outer space away fromgravitational pull, Right. That's making it to me like getting away fromso nothing gravitational no suppressors can actually pull you back. You'reyou're too strong for that. And I asked him that question, what will it take toget into outer space away from gravity? And you know the conversation basicallywhen he said that nobody's ready for that answer, nobody really wants todiscuss that. Uh nobody likes to answer. That's what he always says. He's sohumble, he doesn't think people want to hear what's going on in his brain. Yeah.But at the end of the day, I thought started thinking to myself, well,rocket fuel get you there. Because if you can take all that negative toxicity,which rocket fuel is, it doesn't taste good. I'm sure I haven't tasted it. Itdoesn't smell good. It probably burn your hand if you touched it, just likeall this negative stuff that we deal with in our lives. But if you couldsomehow converted into pushing you forward and thrusting you into outerspace, that's what it's all about. So, you know, let me give you a littlecontext on this. So the first far back as I can remember that, I used anincident and converted it into rocket fuel was when I was a young kid. I grewup in a broken home. I don't remember my parents together and I would do theevery other weekend thing. Like most people that had split up parents andmost cases, you're the only link between your mom and dad for them tohave to communicate and as they move on to other marriages, step parents andall that then add those agendas into the mix. There's a lot of conflict thatstarts to happen and you know, I dealt with this when Iwas eight, my mom decided to get married for the third time and Idecided to not go into another man's house and learn another man's rules. Idecided to try my dad's house and he...

...was onto his second marriage. And sothe first, the point of that, the first part was okay. But then as I got intoit, there was more conflict that was brewing up between my mom, my step mom,my dad, all this stuff was going on and it was pouring down on us kids and alot of it was taken out on me. So I dealt with a lot of emotionalpsychological abuse threats. I used to sleep with a baseball bat a lot ofnights when I was about nine years old, um, just because I was scared and Ididn't have that security feeling. I didn't have that secure feeling. Istill deal with a little bit of this today. These, these it's kind of likean anxiety, but it's more like security. Like I need, I'm always searching forsecurity. Uh, so what I ended up doing was eventually I realized that this isnot an ordinary situation. Your kids shouldn't have to deal with this. And Itold my mom about what was going on and mike. What's funny in an abusivesituation. A lot of times you don't share being abused because you'reafraid of, you know, looking stupid and embarrassed becauseyou let it happen. Um also maybe you just don't believe, I think you thinkthat people will believe you, maybe you're just, you know, dramatizing orthe other one that's kind of funny is you're kind of worried and concernedabout the abuser and what's gonna happen to them. So weird stuff thatgoes on through your head when you're in those situations. So anyway, my momtold me that she was gonna file court papers but I could not flip flop, flipflop back and forth. I had to stick to my guns because if she did that, shedidn't wanna be left hung out to dry if they talked me out of it and she warnedme that they would try. So I, you know, I took that as being stubborn, yougotta make sure you're stubborn, unyielding. It's my favorite word bythe way, unyielding. So uh my dad eventually got these court papersserved to him after weeks and weeks would go by and uh I came home one dayfrom school and the tension in the room was just like packed, something wasgoing on, I knew it and my dad who was my hero, had his own masonry business,brick block concrete, real successful. I always looked up to him for his hardworker, he was, his hands were real rough and his forearms were real big.He's always tan, it's like the professions of us, Italians, right,That's right, that's right. And if you know anything about masons and Italians,they used to, they don't carry a wallet, they carry a wad of $100 bills with arubber band around it. And uh he used to flash it all the time. I thought itwas cool. So when he got these papers and I came home from school he sent meto my room and I waited for him to come back and confront me. Mhm And I wasabout 10.5 I think at the time and when he confronted me, I was just sittingthere waiting like I have no idea what's going to happen, but it's gonnabe bad. And he said you know it says here you want to move in with your mom,I don't understand this, you have everything you need here. Your mom's poor, she's onto her thirdhusband as men coming in and out like and just paint this picture right,right. And I just didn't even get into discussion with him. I remember my momsaid stick to your guns, I said no, I made my mind up. He said, you sure saidit doesn't make sense to me? I'm like, no, because he was kind of denying whatwas going on. I mean there must be fights. I mean it was it was bad. So hesaid, ok, so he takes that wild $100 bills. I just mentioned out pills oneoff, crumples it up and throws at me...

...and says, here, you're gonna need this.Then when you're living on the streets with your mother one day, now hearingthat the stubbornness and me kicked in and I'm like, you're not going todictate my future. It's funny, I'm going to control the future shirt today.I like to control my future, I like to be in control and responsible of myfuture. And at that even at that young age, I just knew that that wasn't gonnaneed that money. But I will tell you ever since that moment that was a sparkthat was lit for 30 some years. I was driving off of that force, driving offof that converting in that and there was a lot of rocket fuel in that inthat moment and every time things get tough, I would use it to get me to thenext level, Get through it or what have you. So two years ago I was goingthrough a tough time in business and I had to do a little self assessment andreally self check to figure out why in my life, no matter what happened to me,do I keep rising? Like why is my graph still go up no matter whatrelationships, where it doesn't matter my own screw ups. I figured it out. Theformula was I was taking all that stuff and doing what I told you stored in mytank, where I could use it as fuel instead of my trunk, where it wouldweigh me down. And I became unstoppable and awareness of that. Once I becameaware is what was powerful, my graph started to shoot straight up instead ofjust a gradual, that's why I had to write the book rocket fuel to get itout to people because I'm the type of person when I find something that works,I'm like an evangelist about it. So that's a little background and contexton that. I think it's tremendous. Um, and you'reright like this is a total mindset thing. You mentioned the wordunyielding. When did you grow an affinity for that word? When did you,when did you finally articulate for yourself that that is a word that youlove and what does it mean to you? So I was always told that I was hardheadedand stubborn as a kid and I thought that was a bad thing and it would betold to me in anger most of the time by my step mom and my dad and now that Ilook back on it, I'm so proud of that damn word. And I looked up thedefinition one day of stubborn and it says in the Merriam Webster dictionary,perversely unyielding. It's the definition of stubborn. Now that couldbe the wrong thing when it's on the wrong thing, right. But then I lookedfurther and I was reading a book by L. Ron Hubbard the other day and it said aword inexorable and I'm like, what the heck does this mean? And I'm the kindof guy that looks upwards because my stepfather who stepped in to be my dadwhen I was 11 George, who's who's since passed. Um he used to tell me, you needto read more, you need to read more. And I would uh I would stop books. Iwould quit books and and in the middle of the book or the quarter of the waythrough, I didn't know why. And he told me he said, you're quitting the booksbecause you don't understand the words you're reading. And I was like, what?So I would ask him, what's this word mean? He'd say go look it up and itwasn't a google thing. It was dictionaries back in the day actually,because dictionaries like encyclopedias, right? So I would look up words andthen I started doing that as a kid and I started reading more and I would beable to finish books because I understood what I was reading and itwas powerful. That was a powerful message. So I looked up this word Xinexorable, I N E X O R A B L E in...

...extra inexorable. And that word isunable to be stopped unyielding. And I'm like holy cow, that's my new word.Because stubborn sometimes, you know, has a negative connotation, inexorable,people have no idea what the hell that means. So now they're going to go lookit up and I'm gonna be like, wow, that's powerful. So be inexorabletowards anything you want to accomplish in life. And I think that's the titleof my next book I'm working on inexorable. Yeah, I'm with you. Like stubborn, stubborn. I've heard in my householdseveral times it started like a mule. Yeah. Sohardheaded, What's the matter with this guy? You know, all this kind of stuff.But I love I love that unstoppable. I wonder how often though, like I thinkof my own past, my own story, how easy it has been at times to stopme and then reverse engineering who thatversion of me was to who I am today, because I am like, my mantra is, don'twait dominate, like go get it done, you know, put your head down and freakingrun through walls to make success happen for yourself. Um Do you findthough the correlation between being easily stoppable and being unstoppableis that we just maybe haven't gained clarity about where we want to go? Yeah, I would say it has something todo with clarity, it has something to do with commitment and it has something todo with consistency. Three C words. That just so happens, see Rock hasthree C words. Uh No, but uh really when it comes down to that, youdefinitely need to be clear on what you want. Because if you're not clear, thenyou have no idea what direction to go right you and by the way, clarity onwhere you're going. And most people miss this one, Michael, most peoplemiss clarity on where they currently are. You see assessment leads toelevation assessment of where you are, which is your point A. So that you knowhow far you have to go to get to your point B if you don't know how thatdistance extends, you don't know what you're going to take the bridge that Somost people miss this when your finances, your health, yourrelationships, you need to assess regularly those areas in your life thatmatter to really get clear and find out really where you are. So that would bethe first in clarity consists I'm sorry, commitment to the next thing. Most ofthe time people stopped because they're not really committed. You know, I was on an airplane over theweekend, coming back from Scottsdale and I was on the wifi and I got a textthat said my plane was gonna be delayed, my next connection flight home, it'sgoing to be delayed for two hours and already had three hour wait three hourslater over. So I was gonna be five hours and I thought to myself rightaway, take time out of the equation, alright, get on, get on rental car, geta rental car drive from Philly to...

Salisbury, 2.5 hour drive. I'll be homebefore the plane takes off easily. Save myself time. And so I made that movequickly, but my bag was on this plane and I knew the bag was gonna go on aconnection to the next flight and I need to get my bag. And I asked theflight attendant how can I get my bag? He's like no theydon't do that, you're gonna have to go to the airport, pick it up becausethey're going to take it to the next plane. I said that's kind of funnybecause I know if I was sick and there's medicine in that bag and Ineeded it they would get that damn bag. So I knew to myself I'm reading runningthis through my head and this is the commitment part. By the way I'mpainting a picture for commitment. I was committed to getting the bag. So Isaid to myself and I told the lady next to me, I said watch I'm gonna get thatbag because her and I have been talking about inexorable and I was talkingabout rocket fuel and I was like, we had a conversation for a couple ofhours prior to that. She laughed and she said you're not going to lie, areyou said no, I don't need to lie. I just know that if I was sick and Ineeded medicine that back they would get it. So there is a way to get it. So then I said, so watch me. And shewas laughing. She's like, there's no way american airlines doesn't do that.You know they you know they had their policies. I said well listen, I'm adifferent than most people now. I'm not gonna be a jerk by the way. You know II just I just go and handle the situation to be committed to it, tofind the answer. So I go out there and I said, hey I need to get my bag, I'mgonna be sitting here five hours, I'm gonna drive instead. I don't think wecan do that, sir. I said, okay, well let me see. You just said, I don'tthink we can do that. So that means that you probably could possibly do it.So let's figure out a way to get this done. And she made a call and we gotthe bag because I was committed. But if I wouldhave listened to the first person and I wasn't committed, of course I wouldhave. I would have been yielding instead of unyielding commitmentanytime you're not getting something you want, you got to check yourcommitment. And then from there, the next thing is, what steps are you doingconsistently enough to get to where you want to go, consistency is the mostboring thing in the world. I agree with you. If anybody says, yeah, but I don'twant to do that, it's boring and while you're being consistent, you don't seethe success, you're having necessarily, you know, and so consistency, there's aformula, the consistency is greater than your emotions, consistency matters more than youremotions. So when you don't feel like doing something, you've got to beconsistent anyway, when it's hard, doesn't matter, you got to do it anyway,and that is how you get 100% participation from yourself because youknow, you're going to do it when it's easy and you know, you're going to doit when you feel good, so just focus on the times you don't feel good and whenit's hard, making sure you get it done and the consistency will take care ofitself, and then before you know it, you look back and I don't evenrecognize yourself and how far you've come. Yeah, this is amazing. Um and Ilove, especially earlier you said I'm gonna remove time from the equation. Doyou think that's a hang up for people that they just are so focused on time?How how do I, how can I be like see rock Cardone, how can I get what theyhave right now, not realizing that what...

...grants 62 63. Mhm. And his story, he'stold 18 zillion times, starting at 25 you know, coming off drug addiction,all this kind of like it required time and he was consistent, he was committedand he was clear on where he wanted to be going. Um How do you, how do youconvey appropriately the importance of removing time from the equation so thatyou can stay committed and focused on being, you know, boringly consistent?Yeah, well by the way, it's not boring once you hit the hit the target. So, um,but but you know, and by the way the targets got to be something that you'reso damn excited about that. It makes you like you feel my energy right now.I hope you feel my energy through this. And before I go into further that partof that, I want to uh explain one thing to you. I don't care what people thinkof me and neither should you, not you, Michael, but anybody that's listening,you included, but you should care about how people experience you. So when Icome on the podcast today, my intention is to have you experienced me in acertain way that when you hang up this zoom call you push whatever to end it,you're like damn dude, holy cow man, I need to go get a, take a break orsomething man, that dude's got some, I mean he's hit me, that's the that'swhat I'm concerned with, and that's what everybody should be payingattention to, not what people think of them. So getting back to the time thingto me, I want to make sure that, you know, I it took me a little while tofigure all this out right, and I turned 40 something and I was like shit man, Iwasted all this time in my life, like I need to move fast now, I have a windowthat's shrinking, I don't know how big that window is, but I know that I needto accomplish what I want to accomplish is in a quicker time. And I realizedthat when I was scared the more time I let pass, the more scared I got right?And so I started trying something, I started trying just doing things assoon as I think of it, do it, do it, do it, do it and then uh like Ben Stillerand uh starsky and hutch do it, come on, do it. Um I just started doing that. Irealized holy shit man, I'm not scared of anything anymore. I don't, I don'tfear anything. I climbed up a mountain Scottsdale. It was scary shit looking.It was high, it was ragged, ragged, jagged, that people look like ants whenI looked at him from. But you know what I just said, You know what? Let's go,let's move, let's get started, just keep going one step at a time, just go,go, go and before you know, we're at the top summit taking pictures.Panoramic felt like very exhilarating. Um but yeah, it's just an example ofhow fear is fueled by time. Yeah, You know, this is interesting. You might bethe one of very few people that I've had aconversation with who yeah, have said I'm not afraid ofanything and I've tried to articulate that two people, I can't explain it. Ijust know that I don't I'm not afraid of anything. You know, like I don't have many fears.Um maybe some of them have been...

...premeditated to the degree that I'mjust not afraid of them them anymore. But you're the first person that I'vetalked to in a long time who shares that sentiment and for a moment year Ifeel very happy that somebody doesn't think I'm an idiot for admitting that.Because usually people are like, oh yeah, come on, you're afraid ofsomething. What if you know this and that happened and this and that, andit's like, you know, but I'm of the sentiment that, uh, I'm the actor not the acted upon.Therefore there are an infinite number of things within my control that I cando something with, even when I think everything's been taken away from me.Whereas most people just like shut down when they're like, oh man, thishappened to me and now this, I can't do this and I can't do that. I'm like, ohman, this happened to me, but I can do this, I can do that. I can weave, I canbob, I can ebb, I can flow. So that's really interesting. Do you think thatjust comes from confidence in these, I guess these three seeds thatproduce confidence, like, you know, you're committed. You know, you've gotclarity, you know, that you're consistent. Is that does that produceconfidence to remove fear? Yeah. Because any time I start to get downthat road, I would just go back to those things there or just remindmyself of the rocket fuel law. What are you scared of? Okay, I'm scared of thishappens. Well, you're going to use it as rocket fuel anyway and it's gonnapropel you further. So why? That's like you're driving down the road, you'relooking for gas stations, you're looking for problems like you're,you're looking for things that would normally scare people because they'regoing to run and you're gonna go to it and grab it and put it in your tank touse it as fuel. And I also look at this, Michael, I look at growing up or notgrown up being born and when I shot out, I'll leave it at that, I was butt naked.I didn't know how to talk. I could barely see, I didn't understandlanguage, I didn't know anything and I made it right now. What's the worstthing that can happen? I lose my shirt, my clothes, my house and I'm butt nakedagain, standing in the street. But now I know how to talk. I have all myexperience and wisdom and I had the rocket fuel law. So, so, and by the way,one other thing, most people are scared because one they don't know where theygo when they die. I'm committed and and sure of where I'm going, I know I'm aspiritual being. The other thing is, uh, this is, this is, this is a good one.But the other thing is that people are worried about what people think. Likeif you had, if you had to go bankrupt and filed bankruptcy and nobody foundout about it. Nobody except for the creditors who don't care. Anyway. It'sa big company, right? Nobody found out about it. You lost your car, your house.Nobody ever found out. No, I don't how that's possible. Nobody found out.Would you think it was that big a deal? Really? You know, that's the question we haveto ask ourselves. So then really what it comes down to is you're worriedabout what people think of you. Yeah. And at the end of the day, if you don'tcare about what people think of you, but you're more worried about yourexperience that you give people, then...

...that cures all the fears. So there'sseveral things that go into it. But at the end of the day, you know, we allhave emotions and I start to I start to get, uh, some kind of feeling and assoon as it kicks in, I recognize it as fast as possible and I take action onit. Yeah. Okay, let me ask you this because you, you've, now I'm thinkingabout something as you say this, what about in a circumstance? Let's say I'man employee, so I'm a car sales professional or I'm a tech, you know,I'm a technician or I work in one of the other departments. Um, I am insomebody else's for sake of, for lack of better words, I am in somebodyelse's ecosystem where the culture is that they are putting a report in frontof me constantly showing me where they think I measure uh, up. How do I um, how do I reconcile what you justsaid about kind of the, this rocket fuel law, not worrying about what otherpeople think when I think so many people are in an environmentpotentially where it's all about what their senior thinks of them. How do you,how do you navigate that or how do you speak to the individual that might feelthat way? Well, first of all, you got to take ownership and responsibility.Like I talked about before deciding where you want to work. Lot of peoplethink that they're stuck in their jobs, right? And you chose to work there. Youhave to accept the job. Now, if you accept the place and you're not alignedwith the core values or the most companies don't even have core values,then you chose that, right? So it's really more about what you chose andtook responsibility to do. You have to own it where you are right now isbecause of the decisions you make, The actions and the words you spoke ordidn't speak. That's that's where you are right now. So first of all, that'swhere you are is on you until you take ownership of that, you're gonna becontrolled by others. And that's why people feel controlled in thosesituations because they don't take ownership and they're giving theownership to someone else. So that's number one. Number two is when you goto whether you're an employee and employer, husband, wife, whatever it is,every day I wake up, I try to be the most valuable person I can possibly be.And then at the end of the day, I assess how I did with that. I don'twait the end of the week. I don't wait a month. I don't not do it at all. I doit every single day. How did I communicate today that I reached? Mytarget was as valuable as possible that I possibly could be, was striving forthat. And when you do that in all situations relationships or at work andespecially if you're an employee and you're doing more than you paid for,you're never going to have an issue because you can always go findsomething else if it doesn't work out there or if they start getting readyjobs because of the economy, it's like the old analogy with the bear, I don'thave to run as fast as a bear, I just have to outrun you, right? So if you'rein an office and you are the most valuable person, you ain't goinganywhere, you know? So those are the things that uh that I look at it inregards to that man. Amazing. See Rock,...

...this has been a tremendous conversationabout taking ownership of your life, it's your life, you got to own it. See Rock, tell me, how can we get ourhands on your new book rocket fuel. So if you go to mike, see rock dot comforward slash book. Mike. See rock dot com forward slash book or on amazon. Ifyou look at Mike's Iraq, you'll see it popped up there. Uh, we just launchedMay 3rd hit best seller list and I'm excited to get that into people's hands.And also you're definitely gonna want engagement, engage with me on linkedinor instagram, uh, reach out to me because we're doing some big, bigthings in the tech space, non tech entrepreneurs. We're teaching them howto get into the tech space and have all the things that they don't have andutilize the things they do have to create tech companies. It's aphenomenal thing. I partnered up with a guy named Jared Yellen. Just afantastic guy. An opportunity. And I have a new tech product calledblueprints and that's on its way out. Uh, in the next 60 days. Amazing man.Thanks so much for joining me on the dealer play. We appreciate you, Michael.Thank you, man. I'm Michel Cirillo and you've beenlistening to the dealer Playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, pleaseclick the subscribe button wherever you're listening right now, leave arating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make bigchanges in your life and career and want to connect with positive,nurturing automotive professionals, join my exclusive DPB Pro community onfacebook. That's where we share information, ideas and content thatisn't shared anywhere else. I can't wait to meet you there. Thanks forlistening.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (475)