The Dealer Playbook
The Dealer Playbook

Episode · 1 year ago

Why Consistency Matters In Content Creation w/ Adley Stump

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Without the right content creation process and mindset, it would be easy to give up. Adley created video content for 8 1/2 years before people paid attention. She had some wins and losses along the way, but the compounding effect of creating content consistently is what has helped her win.

Maybe you have a few videos under your belt and your looking for more video creation tips or a process that will scale, remember that you also need to keep focused on why you are creating content to begin with. Keeping focused will help you remain consistent even when you feel like nobody is watching or listening.

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Hey, gang, you know what's on my mind? More than deleting all the annoying kids shows that show up in my YouTube watch. History from over quarantine. Better marketing decisions. Yep, that's right. That's why I'm so excited to be supported by my friends at pure cars who put the power of data and superior information into the hands of dealers where it belongs. Use peer car to make better marketing decisions and get better results. Visit Pierre cars dot com to get a free no risk, no obligation digital strategy analysis today That's pure cars dot com. I should clarify that that process to getting to where we are now was 8.5 years of trying and nobody watching and nobody caring and nobody listening. If...

...that can be an encouragement to some of you being really, really frustrate with content creation, you think what you're doing is great. But people still aren't resonating. It is and and was an 8.5 year process to get to this 180 million views a week, Um, and what contributed to that was staying in the game, the right people finding me and paying attention still, but not a lot of other people were, but they saw the value coming. They saw potential. So it was staying focused on this goal. And then an opportunity did come, and it came completely out of left field while I was dedicated to the craft. So I was vlogging every week for about a year that 13 people watched y'all. 13 people cared about my vlog, but I cared about it. I was learning the craft. I was learning how to edit. I was learning what worked, What didn't all of life. I generally tend to think of as an experiment, a really exciting experiment. Um, and that's what this was for me because I've always...

...maintained the mindset. Would I want to be doing this and adding value in this way if I never got paid for? Nobody ever really cared. And people caring as a delicate subject because you can't be a people pleaser in the content business, you have to be pretty decisive on who you are, because every other comment at least my world hates the comment, hates the content, and every other person loves it because we are not specifically, Niche were very very wide. Um, So I had to know that I loved doing this. I was going to figure it out, no matter what it took. Um, so that to say it was an 8.5 year process of figuring out how to really do this the right way. I think that's so tremendous. Even if you look back at guys like Gary V and you go back to his very first episode 11 or 12 years ago of Wine Library, I think it's still only has, like, 1000 views. And when you contrast that to 11 years later, Gary, it's you know, we're seeing this pattern over and over again. I do...

...podcasting for seven years to get to where I'm at your doing this content creation for 8.5 years to get to where you're at to experience what you're experiencing and enjoying the journey. I think what you just said is something that resonates so deeply with me that you see life as an experience like you're excited. You're you're curious. You want to keep improving. Is that what, um, made you want to try new things? Because I can imagine along the way you were probably thinking, Oh, if we do this in in these videos, maybe it'll give us this response. How do you know? Is that kind of how it played out for you? And how long were you willing to try that same thing to to really understand if it worked? Great question. I was willing to try it as long as as long as it took, because I genuinely loved doing that. That it And I think that was People saw through that over time. Even though the audience was small, it was still generally engaging and entertaining to them. But here's...

...where the pivot came is I was still in music, right? And I was trying to wait for permission from a suit behind a desk to tell me when, where and high and how I could be successful. Right? I was writing songs every day, turning him in, and I felt so small and so reduced that I was just having to wait for permission from my life to begin as a musician and just my temperament that didn't sit well with me. So I was always trying to find ways to break through the noise and thinking. Okay, As a musician, I have a very intangible skill, right? It's personality or it's a voice and you can't meet. Those aren't immediately monetize herbal things, right? They're not books or speaking engagements and music itself is free. So how do you get people to genuinely care without you telling them to care whether it's music or anything else? Hey, guys, by my by my song, tell all your friends tell all your family how do you genuinely get them to want to do that without you having to beg them to, um and I'll use this example because I think it can be applicable...

...and valuable to the audience. And I can look back at this now. And I just laugh at God's plan of how all all roads pointed me doing what I'm doing now. But I was thinking about how to get people to share something right. I was like, Okay, I got a song coming out. I've got a song out. No one cares. How do I get them to start talking about it? And it was making something in it for them. So word of mouth, right? So I put out on Twitter. Hey, I do. If you guys retweet my last tweet about my single 200 times, I'll steal the country music stars car And it worked. It worked. Twitter went crazy because I had I used what I had. I used the immediate resource, which was just coming off television. So I had a little bit of followers. How do I get their attention and keep it right? That was the first thing. So Twitter went crazy. Sales did all right because of that way, more sales than I would have had otherwise. So I'm celebrating. I'm dancing. And then that's it. I'm like, Oh, my God,...

I'm gonna steal a car. What the heck am I gonna do? How am I gonna do that? So I Joe Diffie, if anybody if anybody knows Joe Diffie, rest in peace, We lost him this year or last year in 2020. But I went he was a buddy and I went to his wife and was like, Listen, I did a dumb, dumb thing, and then I got to follow through with it. Can I Can I steal your husband's car? Uh, went to his wife and she goes, Yeah, This is great. So everybody knew I was going to steal a car. But how do we go? Bigger than that, right? That's a pretty big initial thing. But how do we make it even bigger? So that the content, the initial content as most of us on this stage, no is the initial lead magnet to something bigger, right? And even in my content now I go really, really wide with humor, and I boil it down to heart to something that really matters to something more intentional. So big is going to steal a car. And then I'm like, Oh, my God. Well, what am I gonna do with it now? I got their attention. Is that going to be the end of it? So I drove a really crappy Nissan Cube at...

...the time, and I, uh I was friends with the dealership and I had a I had just a little bit of attention. So I went to I went to the Nissan dealership. I wrote up this little paper and we just had a ton of tornadoes back. I'm in Nashville. We had tornadoes are just destroyed. My hometown back in Oklahoma, and I knew of families who lost everything. They lost their home, a newborn baby. They lost all their transportation. So I was like, How do we use this really wide thing to do something really, really great and meaningful to do it for a purpose. So I walked into the Nissan dealership. The guy I bought my car and was like, Hey, I got this idea. What if I steal Jo's car and y'all step in and they're like, No, no ad. Give it back. We and we're going to do something really great. So my plan was to do a three day social media goose chase from stealing the car, and then I'm like, Where is she going? What is she doing with it? Joe kicks off the hashtag Where's Adlai? For three days? It's a social media goose chase to see where I'm going and what I'm doing. And I'm...

...always alluding to I'm going to do something and we ended up giving that car away. Uh, the point was to give a car away to a family in Moore, Oklahoma, who had lost everything. And so Nissan stepped in, gave me a card. They ran our proposal up the flagpole turned around a car for me in two weeks, and I said, Listen, I'll bring TV and I'll do six stops at six different Nissan dealerships along the way. I'll bring TV and radio to everyone, and we're gonna make this awesome had no idea what the heck I was doing. I knew why I had no idea what the hell was gonna be. Didn't know if I could pull this off. But I had a couple of people believe in me because they saw that I believed in myself first and had this undying passion to pull this really weird thing off. And it worked. So all that to say, That's one of my favorite stories of initially in a totally different business, recognizing the power of storytelling. How to make people feel a part of something bigger than themselves and attention hacking and using that initial content piece to do...

...something big and attach people to that mission and keep their attention throughout the initial journey. I'm Michel Cirillo, and you've been listening to the dealer playbook podcast. If you haven't yet, please click the subscribe button wherever you're listening. Right now, leave a rating or review and share it with a colleague. If you're ready to make big changes in your life and career and want to connect with positive, nurturing automotive professionals, join my exclusive dpb pro community on Facebook. That's where we share information, ideas and content that isn't shared anywhere else. I can't wait to meet you there. Thanks for listening.

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